menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.
Starbucks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. Starbucks Corporation Type Public (NASDAQ: SBUX,SEHK: 4337) Founded In 1971 across from Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington Headquarters Seattle, Washington, USA Key people Howard Schultz, Chairman, President and CEO Martin Coles, Chief Operating Officer James C. Alling, President, Starbucks International Peter Bocian, Chief Financial Officer Industry Restaurants Retail Coffee and Tea Retail Beverages Entertainment Products Whole Bean Coffee Boxed Tea Made-to-order beverages Bottled beverages Baked Goods Merchandise Frappuccino beverages Revenue ? US$7.786 billion (2006) Employees 147,436 Subsidiaries Starbucks Coffee Company Tazo Tea Company Seattle's Best Coffee Torrefazione Italia Hear Music Ethos Water Website Starbucks.com Starbucks Corporation (NASDAQ: SBUX [3]; SEHK: 4337) is a multinational coffee and coffeehouse chain company based in the United States. Starbucks is the largest coffeehouse company in the world,[1] with 15,011 stores in 42 countries.[2] Starbucks sells drip brewed coffee, espresso-based hot drinks, other hot and cold drinks, snacks and items such as mugs and coffee beans. Through the Starbucks Entertainment division and Hear Music brand, the company also markets books, music, and film. Many of these products are seasonal or specific to the locality of the store. Starbucks brand ice cream and coffee are also sold at grocery stores. From Starbucks's founding in Seattle, Washington, as a local coffee bean roaster and retailer, Starbucks has expanded rapidly. In the 1990s, the company was opening a new store every workday, a pace that continued into the 2000s. Domestic growth has since slowed down, though the company continues to expand in foreign markets and is opening 7 stores a day worldwide. The first location outside of the U.S. and Canada was established in 1996, and they now constitute almost one third of Starbucks' stores.[3] As of November 2007, Starbucks had 8,505 company-owned outlets worldwide: 6,793 of them in the United States and 1,712 in other countries and U.S. territories. In addition, the company has 6,506 joint-venture and licensed outlets, 3,891 of them in the United States and 2,615 in other countries and U.S. territories. This brings the total locations (as of November 2007) to 15,011 worldwide.[2] Starbucks can be found in many popular grocery chains in the U.S. and Canada, as well as in many airports. Starbucks' corporate headquarters are in Seattle, Washington, United States. As of January 2008, the members of the company's board of directors are Howard Schultz (Chair), Barbara Bass, Howard Behar, Bill Bradley, Mellody Hobson, Olden Lee, James Shennan, Jr., Javier Teruel, Myron Ullman, III, and Craig Weatherup. Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Products 2.1 Staffing 2.2 "The Third Place" 2.3 International operations 3 Intellectual property 3.1 Name 3.2 Logo 3.3 Parodies and infringements 4 Criticism and controversy 4.1 Cultural imperialism 4.2 Anti-competitive tactics 4.3 Labor disputes 4.4 Coffee bean market 4.5 Ethos water controversy 4.6 Recycled paper cups 5 Other ventures 5.1 Starbucks and Apple 6 See also 7 References 8 External links [edit] History The original Starbucks was opened in Seattle, Washington, in 1971 by three partners: English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegel, and writer Gordon Bowker. The three were inspired by Alfred Peet, whom they knew personally, to open their first store in Pike Place Market to sell high-quality coffee beans and equipment. The original Starbucks location was at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971-1976. That store then moved to 1912 Pike Place; it is still open. During their first year of operation, they purchased green coffee beans from Peet's, then began buying directly from growers. A Starbucks coffee shop in Leeds, United KingdomEntrepreneur Howard Schultz joined the company in 1982, and, after a trip to Milan, advised that the company sell coffee and espresso drinks as well as beans. The owners rejected this idea, believing that getting into the beverage business would distract the company from its primary focus. To them, coffee was something to be prepared in the home. Certain that there was much money to be made selling drinks to on-the-go Americans, Schultz started the Il Giornale coffee bar chain in 1985. In 1984, the original owners of Starbucks, led by Baldwin, took the opportunity to purchase Peet's (Baldwin still works there today). In 1987, they sold the Starbucks chain to Schultz's Il Giornale, which rebranded the Il Giornale outlets as Starbucks and quickly began to expand. Starbucks opened its first locations outside Seattle at Waterfront Station in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (which now has more locations than anywhere in the world)[citation needed] and Chicago, Illinois, United States that same year. At the time of its initial public offering on the stock market in 1992, Starbucks had grown to 165 outlets. Starbucks Headquarters, Seattle.The first Starbucks location outside of North America opened in Tokyo in 1996. Starbucks entered the U.K. market in 1998 with the acquisition of the then 60-outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company, re-branding all its stores as Starbucks. By November 2005, London had more outlets than Manhattan,[4] a sign of Starbucks becoming an international brand. In April 2003, Starbucks completed the purchase of Seattle's Best Coffee and Torrefazione Italia from AFC Enterprises, bringing the total number of Starbucks-operated locations worldwide to more than 6,400. On September 14, 2006, rival Diedrich Coffee announced that it would sell most of its company-owned retail stores to Starbucks. This sale includes the company owned locations of the Oregon-based Coffee People chain. Starbucks representatives have been quoted as saying they will convert the Diedrich Coffee and Coffee People locations to Starbucks stores.[5][6] Starbucks' chairman, Howard Schultz, has talked about the tension that exists in the company between their rapid expansion (they aim to eventually operate 40,000 retail stores worldwide)[7] and their collective desire to act like a small company. In January 2008, Chairman Howard Schultz resumed his role as Chief Executive Officer, replacing Jim Donald, who had succeeded Schultz in 2000. Schultz's principal challenge is to restore what he calls the "distinctive Starbucks experience" in the face of rapid expansion. Analysts believe that Schultz must determine how to contend with higher materials prices and enhanced competition from lower-price competitors, including McDonald's and Dunkin' Donuts. [8] On January 31, 2008, Schultz announced that Starbucks would discontinue its warm food products, originally scheduled to launch nationwide in 2008, in order to refocus the brand on coffee. Also in January 2008, with Dunkin' Donuts and McDonalds quickly becoming stiff competition in the specialty coffee market, Starbucks started testing selling an 8 oz "short" brewed coffee for $1 and giving free refills on all brewed coffee. So far this test is limited to the greater Seattle market, with no plans for expansion to national markets as of yet. The normal price for a short brewed coffee at Starbucks is about $1.50, when Dunkin' Donuts 10 ounce coffee runs for $1.39 and McDonalds' 12 ounce premium coffee is $1.07. [9] [edit] Products A Starbucks Venti Java Chip FrappuccinoStarbucks serves a variety of beverages including brewed coffee, hot chocolate, espresso, teas, and Frappuccino. Also available are bottled beverages including Naked Juice, Ethos water, San Pellegrino, Izze soda, and Horizon Organic Milk. Cappuccinos, and all other beverages with steamed-milk and/or foam can be customized to order with pumps of flavored syrups, reasonable temperature changes and additional espresso shots. Starbucks also offers blended beverages, such as the "Frappuccino Blended Coffee", a flavored drink of coffee, milk, and sugar blended with ice. The name is a portmanteau of frappé and cappuccino and was introduced in 1995. Starbucks markets seasonal beverages as well, such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte (Thanksgiving) Gingerbread Latte, Peppermint Mocha, Eggnog Latte (Christmas) and Leprechaun Latte (St. Patrick's Day). There is also seasonal brewed coffee, like the "Christmas Blend" of whole bean coffee. Starbucks supplements the beverage offerings with pastries, salads, cold sandwiches, coffee merchandise and at-home brewing equipment, and pre-packed or scooped coffee beans. Starbucks also has a variety of kosher products, but due to business hours and sandwich products a Starbucks retail store cannot be certified 'kosher' according to Jewish law.[10] Starbucks does not franchise with individuals within North America but does enter into licensing arrangements with some companies.[11] One example is of Starbucks store locations in airports, most of which are operated by HMSHost, owned by the Italian Autogrill group. Other licensed locations include grocery stores, major food services corporations, college and university campuses, and hospitals. In addition, Starbucks has partnered with Magic Johnson's Johnson Development Corporation to form Urban Coffee Opportunities, which opens retail locations in low-income urban areas.[12] [edit] Staffing There are usually from two to six partners (as Starbucks employees are called), all of them trained baristas, in each retail store at any one time. Black aprons labeled "Coffee Master" are worn by employees who have completed the Coffee Master course, which educates employees in not only the tasting, but also growing regions, roasting and purchasing (including fair trade practices) aspects of the coffee industry. In the United States and Canada Starbucks offers full benefits such as health, dental, and vision insurance, as well as stock-option grants and 401k with matching to employees who work an average of at least 20 hours per week. Each employee can receive a box of tea or a pound of coffee each week if they choose. As of 2008, Starbucks was ranked by Fortune magazine as the 7th best company to work for in the United States, up from 16th in 2007. In 2006 and 2005 it was ranked 29th and 11th, respectively.[13] Starbucks was also voted as one of the top ten UK workplaces by the Financial Times in 2007. [edit] "The Third Place" Starbucks in Frankfurt am Main, GermanyStarbucks envisions local outlets as a "third place" (besides home and work) to spend time, and store design is intended to achieve this. The café section of the store is often outfitted with stuffed chairs and tables with hard-backed chairs. Most stores provide free electricity for customers, and many stores also provide wireless internet access (provided in American stores by T-Mobile[14] and in Canadian stores by Bell Mobility[15]) The company is noted for its non-smoking policy at almost all of its outlets, despite predictions that this would never succeed in markets such as Germany, which used to have few restrictions on smoking. This has changed in 2007 with many German states issuing smoking bans for restaurants and bars. Outlets in Vienna and Mexico City, which have smoking rooms separated by double doors from the coffee shop itself, and a smoking room upstairs in the Largo do Senado, Macau, branch are the closest the company has come to making exceptions. According to the company, the smoking ban is to ensure that the coffee aroma is not adulterated. The company also asks its employees to refrain from wearing strong perfumes for similar reasons.[16] Starbucks generally does not prohibit smoking in outside seating areas, unless required by local codes. [edit] International operations Countries that contain Starbucks stores A typical sales area, this one in Peterborough, UK, showing a display of food and the beverage preparation area Starbucks inside Tsutaya in Shibuya, JapanStores are now found in Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia[17], Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. New stores will be opened in Argentina[18], Bulgaria[19] , Colombia[20], Hungary[21], India, Iraq, Morocco, Poland[22], Portugal[23], Serbia and South Africa. [edit] Intellectual property Starbucks U.S. Brands, LLC, is a Starbucks-owned company that currently holds and owns the property rights to approximately 120 Starbucks Coffee Company patents and trademarks. It is located at 2525 Starbucks Way in Minden, Nevada.[24] [edit] Name The company is named in part after Starbuck, Captain Ahab's first mate in the book Moby-Dick, as well as a turn-of-the-century mining camp (Starbo or Storbo) on Mount Rainier. According to Howard Schultz's book Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time, the name of the company was derived from Moby-Dick, although not in as direct a fashion as many assume. Gordon Bowker liked the name "Pequod" (the ship in the novel), but his creative partner Terry Heckler responded, "No one's going to drink a cup of Pee-quod!" Heckler suggested "Starbo." Brainstorming with these two ideas resulted in the company being named for the Pequod's first mate, Starbuck.[25] International names include: Arabic-speaking countries: ??????? (transliteration: starbaks) China, Hong Kong, Taiwan: ??? Pinyin: xingbakè (? xing means "star", while ?ba ?kè is a transliteration of "-bucks") Israel: ??????? (transliteration: s?arbaqs) Japan: ??????? (transliteration: sutabakkusu, phonological: staa-bahkss) South Korea: ???? (transliteration: seutabeokseu), often used in conjunction with the English name Quebec, Canada: Café Starbucks Coffee[26] (added the French word to avoid controversy with local language politics) Thailand: ?????????? pronounced [sota?bak?o] [edit] Logo The logo is a "twin-tailed siren" (the siren of Greek mythology).[27] The logo has been significantly streamlined over the years. In the first version, which gave the impression of an authentic 18th century European woodcut, the Starbucks siren was topless and had a fully-visible double fish tail. The image also had a rough visual texture. In the second version, her chest was covered by her flowing hair, but her navel was still visible, and the fish tail was cropped slightly. In the current version, her navel and chest are not visible at all, and only vestiges remain of the fish tails. The original "woodcut" logo can still be seen on the Starbucks store in Seattle's Pike Place Market, and on certain coffee bags. At the beginning of September 2006, Starbucks temporarily reintroduced its original brown logo on paper hot drink cups. Starbucks has stated that this was done to show the company's heritage from the Pacific Northwest and to celebrate 35 years of business. The vintage logo has sparked some controversy due to the siren's bare chest. Recently, an elementary school principal in Kent, Washington, was reported as asking teachers to "cover up" the mermaid of the retro cups with a cup sleeve of some kind.[27] [edit] Parodies and infringements In 2000, San Francisco cartoonist Kieron Dwyer was sued by Starbucks for copyright and trademark infringement after creating a parody of its siren logo and putting it on coffee mugs, t-shirts, and stickers that he sold on his website and at comic book conventions. Dwyer felt that since his work was a parody it was protected by his right to free speech under U.S. law. The judge agreed that Dwyer's work was a parody and thus enjoyed constitutional protection; however, he was forbidden from financially "profiting" from using a "confusingly similar" image of the Starbucks siren logo. Dwyer is currently allowed to display the image as an expression of free speech, but he can no longer sell it.[28] In 2003, Starbucks successfully sued a Shanghai competitor in China for trademark infringement, because that chain used a green-and-white logo with a similar sounding Chinese name.[29] Also in 2003, Starbucks sent a cease-and-desist letter to "HaidaBucks Coffee House" in Masset, British Columbia, Canada. The store was owned by a group of young Haida men, commonly referred to as "bucks." After facing criticism, Starbucks dropped its demand after HaidaBucks dropped "coffee house" from its name.[30] In 2005 Starbucks lost a trademark infringement case against a smaller coffee vendor in South Korea that operates coffee stations under the name and style Starpreya. The company, Elpreya, says Starpreya is named after the Norse goddess, Freja, with the letters of that name changed to ease pronunciation by Koreans. The court rejected the Seattle-based retailer's claim that the logo of Starpreya is too similar to the famous Starbucks logo.[31] [edit] Criticism and controversy Starbucks has come to be regarded by some, particularly in the global justice movement, as symbolic of the problems posed by globalization. Several activist groups maintain websites criticizing the company's fair-trade policies, labor relations, and environmental impact, and hold it as a prime example of U.S. cultural and economic imperialism. Several Starbucks locations were vandalized during the WTO meeting held in Seattle in late 1999. Although no organization claimed responsibility for the vandalism, the anarchist circle-A symbol was spray-painted on several stores.[32] [edit] Cultural imperialism Starbucks at the Forbidden City in Beijing (closed since July 2007)The Starbucks location in the former imperial palace in Beijing closed in July 2007. The coffee shop had been a source of ongoing controversy since its opening in 2000 with protesters objecting that the presence of the American chain in this location "was trampling on Chinese culture".[33][34][35][36] [edit] Anti-competitive tactics Some of the methods Starbucks has used to expand and maintain their dominant market position, such as buying out competitors' leases, acquiring independent coffee shops and converting them into Starbucks stores, and clustering several locations in a small geographical area (i.e., saturating the market), have been labeled anti-competitive by critics.[37] For example, Starbucks fueled its initial expansion into the UK market with a buyout of its only major potential competitor (the 49 outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company), then used its capital and influence to obtain prime locations, some of which operated at a financial loss. Critics claimed this was an unfair attempt to drive out small, independent competitors, who could not afford to pay inflated prices for premium real estate.[38] [edit] Labor disputes Since 2004, workers at seven Starbucks stores in New York City have joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) as the Starbucks Workers Union.[39] According to a Starbucks Union press release, since then, the union membership has begun expanding to Chicago and Maryland.[40] On March 7, 2006, the IWW and Starbucks agreed to a National Labor Relations Board settlement in which three Starbucks workers were granted almost US$2,000 in back wages and two fired employees were offered reinstatement.[41][42][43] According to the Starbucks Union, on November 24, 2006, IWW members picketed Starbucks locations in more than 50 cities around the world in countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain and New Zealand, as well as U.S. cities including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco,[44] to protest the firing of five Starbucks Workers Union organizers by Starbucks and to demand their reinstatement. Some Starbucks baristas in Canada,[45] Australia and New Zealand,[46] and the United States[47] belong to a variety of unions. In 2005, Starbucks paid out US$165,000 to eight employees at its Kent, Washington, roasting plant to settle charges that they had been retaliated against for being pro-union. At the time, the plant workers were represented by the IUOE. Starbucks admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement.[39] A Starbucks strike occurred in Auckland, New Zealand, on November 23, 2005.[46] Organized by Unite Union, workers sought secure hours, a minimum wage of NZ$12 an hour, and the abolition of youth rates. The company settled with the Union in 2006, resulting in pay increases, increased security of hours, and an improvement in youth rates.[48] According to Starbucks Chairman Howard Schulz, "If they had faith in me and my motives, they wouldn't need a union." According to The Seattle Times, "The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 286 had trouble with Starbucks at its Kent roasting plant, where the union no longer represents workers".[39] [edit] Coffee bean market In 2000, the company introduced a line of fair trade products.[49] Of the approximately 136,000 tonnes (300 million pounds) of coffee Starbucks purchased in 2006, about 6 percent was certified as fair trade.[50] According to Starbucks, they purchased 2,180 tonnes (4.8 million pounds) of Certified Fair Trade coffee in fiscal year 2004 and 5,220 tonnes (11.5 million pounds) in 2005. They have become the largest buyer of Certified Fair Trade coffee in North America (10% of the global market). Transfair USA,[51] the only third-party certifier of Fair Trade Certified coffee in the United States, has noted the impact Starbucks has made in the area of Fair Trade and coffee farmer's lives by saying: Since launching {its} FTC coffee line in 2000, Starbucks has undeniably made a significant contribution to family farmers through their rapidly growing FTC coffee volume. By offering FTC coffee in thousands of stores, Starbucks has also given the FTC label greater visibility, helping to raise consumer awareness in the process. Groups such as Global Exchange are calling for Starbucks to further increase its sales of fair trade coffees. However, fair trade certification can cost US$20,000 to US$30,000[citation needed], and many growers are unwilling or unable to pay for certification[citation needed]. [edit] Ethos water controversy Ethos, a brand of bottled water acquired by Starbucks in 2005, is sold at locations throughout North America. Ethos bottles feature prominent labeling stating "helping children get clean water", referring to the fact that $.05 from each $1.80USD bottle sold ($.10 per unit in Canada) is used to fund clean water projects in under-developed areas. Critics have argued that the claim on the label misleads consumers into thinking that Ethos is primarily a charitable organization, when it is actually a for-profit Starbucks brand and the vast majority of the sale price (over 94%) does not support clean-water projects.[52] Although sales of Ethos water has raised over $4,000,000 for clean water efforts, the brand is not a charity and has added to Starbucks revenue.[53] The founders of Ethos have stated that the brand is intended to raise awareness of third-world clean water issues and provide socially responsible consumers with an opportunity to support the cause by choosing Ethos over other brands.[54] Starbucks has since redesigned the American version of the Ethos water bottles, stating the amount of money donated per bottle in the description. [edit] Recycled paper cups In 2006, Starbucks introduced cups made with 10 percent recycled material. With 1.5 billion cups used annually in the United States at that time, the change was estimated to save approximately five million pounds of virgin tree fiber a year. Prior to the announcement, Starbucks used recycled paper into its cardboard cup sleeves, napkins, and cardboard carriers. A major obstacle for the recycled paper cup was that recycled content had never before been used in direct contact with food, especially not with steaming hot beverages. Although permission was not required, Starbucks and its pulp manufacturer, the Mississippi River Corporation, decided to seek Food and Drug Administration approval for the new cups. Had Starbucks not bothered to get F.D.A. approval, the cup development process would have taken only three months instead of more than two years. Starbucks said it was the first time that a national food chain had incorporated recycled material into packaging that comes into direct contact with food or beverages, but critics claim that the company should be doing much more to protect the environment.[55][56] [edit] Other ventures Main article: Hear Music Starbucks entered the music industry in 1999 with the acquisition of Hear Music, and the film industry in 2006 with the creation of Starbucks Entertainment. Starbucks Entertainment was one of the producers of the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee. Retail stores heavily advertised the film before its release. Hear Music is the brand name of Starbucks' retail music concept. Hear Music began as a catalog company in 1990 and was purchased by Starbucks in 1999. Nearly three years later, in 2002, they produced a Starbucks opera album, featuring artists such as Luciano Pavarotti. [edit] Starbucks and Apple Starbucks has entered into a partnership with Apple to collaborate on selling music as part of the coffeehouse experience. In October of 2006, Apple added a Starbucks Entertainment area to the iTunes Music Store, selling similar music that appeared in Starbucks stores. In September of 2007 Apple announced that there would be wireless communication between Apple and Starbucks. Through the T-Mobile Wi-Fi, a paywall is opened up to allow any individual connecting to T-Mobile Hotspot access to the iTunes Music Store (regardless of whether he or she is a T-Mobile Hotspot subscriber). The partnership is primarily targeted at iPhone, iPod Touch, and Macbook users (although anyone with access to iTunes can take advantage of it). In addition, the iTunes Music Store will automatically detect the current and last 10 songs playing in a Starbucks and offer users connected to the store's wireless network the opportunity to download the tracks. This feature has been rolled out in Seattle, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area, and will slowly be offered in limited markets during 2007-2008.[57] During the fall of 2007 Starbucks also began to sell digital downloads of certain albums through iTunes. The buyer would buy the download at Starbucks, and enter the code on the download card at the iTunes Music Store, and then the entire album would immediately start downloading. From October 2 to November 7, 2007, Starbucks gave away 37 different songs for free download through iTunes as part of the "Song of the Day" promotion. Each day, baristas would give out download cards for a particular song which could be redeemed on [edit] See also List of coffeehouse chains
menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.
Starbucks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. Starbucks Corporation Type Public (NASDAQ: SBUX,SEHK: 4337) Founded In 1971 across from Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington Headquarters Seattle, Washington, USA Key people Howard Schultz, Chairman, President and CEO Martin Coles, Chief Operating Officer James C. Alling, President, Starbucks International Peter Bocian, Chief Financial Officer Industry Restaurants Retail Coffee and Tea Retail Beverages Entertainment Products Whole Bean Coffee Boxed Tea Made-to-order beverages Bottled beverages Baked Goods Merchandise Frappuccino beverages Revenue ? US$7.786 billion (2006) Employees 147,436 Subsidiaries Starbucks Coffee Company Tazo Tea Company Seattle's Best Coffee Torrefazione Italia Hear Music Ethos Water Website Starbucks.com Starbucks Corporation (NASDAQ: SBUX [3]; SEHK: 4337) is a multinational coffee and coffeehouse chain company based in the United States. Starbucks is the largest coffeehouse company in the world,[1] with 15,011 stores in 42 countries.[2] Starbucks sells drip brewed coffee, espresso-based hot drinks, other hot and cold drinks, snacks and items such as mugs and coffee beans. Through the Starbucks Entertainment division and Hear Music brand, the company also markets books, music, and film. Many of these products are seasonal or specific to the locality of the store. Starbucks brand ice cream and coffee are also sold at grocery stores. From Starbucks's founding in Seattle, Washington, as a local coffee bean roaster and retailer, Starbucks has expanded rapidly. In the 1990s, the company was opening a new store every workday, a pace that continued into the 2000s. Domestic growth has since slowed down, though the company continues to expand in foreign markets and is opening 7 stores a day worldwide. The first location outside of the U.S. and Canada was established in 1996, and they now constitute almost one third of Starbucks' stores.[3] As of November 2007, Starbucks had 8,505 company-owned outlets worldwide: 6,793 of them in the United States and 1,712 in other countries and U.S. territories. In addition, the company has 6,506 joint-venture and licensed outlets, 3,891 of them in the United States and 2,615 in other countries and U.S. territories. This brings the total locations (as of November 2007) to 15,011 worldwide.[2] Starbucks can be found in many popular grocery chains in the U.S. and Canada, as well as in many airports. Starbucks' corporate headquarters are in Seattle, Washington, United States. As of January 2008, the members of the company's board of directors are Howard Schultz (Chair), Barbara Bass, Howard Behar, Bill Bradley, Mellody Hobson, Olden Lee, James Shennan, Jr., Javier Teruel, Myron Ullman, III, and Craig Weatherup. Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Products 2.1 Staffing 2.2 "The Third Place" 2.3 International operations 3 Intellectual property 3.1 Name 3.2 Logo 3.3 Parodies and infringements 4 Criticism and controversy 4.1 Cultural imperialism 4.2 Anti-competitive tactics 4.3 Labor disputes 4.4 Coffee bean market 4.5 Ethos water controversy 4.6 Recycled paper cups 5 Other ventures 5.1 Starbucks and Apple 6 See also 7 References 8 External links [edit] History The original Starbucks was opened in Seattle, Washington, in 1971 by three partners: English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegel, and writer Gordon Bowker. The three were inspired by Alfred Peet, whom they knew personally, to open their first store in Pike Place Market to sell high-quality coffee beans and equipment. The original Starbucks location was at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971-1976. That store then moved to 1912 Pike Place; it is still open. During their first year of operation, they purchased green coffee beans from Peet's, then began buying directly from growers. A Starbucks coffee shop in Leeds, United KingdomEntrepreneur Howard Schultz joined the company in 1982, and, after a trip to Milan, advised that the company sell coffee and espresso drinks as well as beans. The owners rejected this idea, believing that getting into the beverage business would distract the company from its primary focus. To them, coffee was something to be prepared in the home. Certain that there was much money to be made selling drinks to on-the-go Americans, Schultz started the Il Giornale coffee bar chain in 1985. In 1984, the original owners of Starbucks, led by Baldwin, took the opportunity to purchase Peet's (Baldwin still works there today). In 1987, they sold the Starbucks chain to Schultz's Il Giornale, which rebranded the Il Giornale outlets as Starbucks and quickly began to expand. Starbucks opened its first locations outside Seattle at Waterfront Station in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (which now has more locations than anywhere in the world)[citation needed] and Chicago, Illinois, United States that same year. At the time of its initial public offering on the stock market in 1992, Starbucks had grown to 165 outlets. Starbucks Headquarters, Seattle.The first Starbucks location outside of North America opened in Tokyo in 1996. Starbucks entered the U.K. market in 1998 with the acquisition of the then 60-outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company, re-branding all its stores as Starbucks. By November 2005, London had more outlets than Manhattan,[4] a sign of Starbucks becoming an international brand. In April 2003, Starbucks completed the purchase of Seattle's Best Coffee and Torrefazione Italia from AFC Enterprises, bringing the total number of Starbucks-operated locations worldwide to more than 6,400. On September 14, 2006, rival Diedrich Coffee announced that it would sell most of its company-owned retail stores to Starbucks. This sale includes the company owned locations of the Oregon-based Coffee People chain. Starbucks representatives have been quoted as saying they will convert the Diedrich Coffee and Coffee People locations to Starbucks stores.[5][6] Starbucks' chairman, Howard Schultz, has talked about the tension that exists in the company between their rapid expansion (they aim to eventually operate 40,000 retail stores worldwide)[7] and their collective desire to act like a small company. In January 2008, Chairman Howard Schultz resumed his role as Chief Executive Officer, replacing Jim Donald, who had succeeded Schultz in 2000. Schultz's principal challenge is to restore what he calls the "distinctive Starbucks experience" in the face of rapid expansion. Analysts believe that Schultz must determine how to contend with higher materials prices and enhanced competition from lower-price competitors, including McDonald's and Dunkin' Donuts. [8] On January 31, 2008, Schultz announced that Starbucks would discontinue its warm food products, originally scheduled to launch nationwide in 2008, in order to refocus the brand on coffee. Also in January 2008, with Dunkin' Donuts and McDonalds quickly becoming stiff competition in the specialty coffee market, Starbucks started testing selling an 8 oz "short" brewed coffee for $1 and giving free refills on all brewed coffee. So far this test is limited to the greater Seattle market, with no plans for expansion to national markets as of yet. The normal price for a short brewed coffee at Starbucks is about $1.50, when Dunkin' Donuts 10 ounce coffee runs for $1.39 and McDonalds' 12 ounce premium coffee is $1.07. [9] [edit] Products A Starbucks Venti Java Chip FrappuccinoStarbucks serves a variety of beverages including brewed coffee, hot chocolate, espresso, teas, and Frappuccino. Also available are bottled beverages including Naked Juice, Ethos water, San Pellegrino, Izze soda, and Horizon Organic Milk. Cappuccinos, and all other beverages with steamed-milk and/or foam can be customized to order with pumps of flavored syrups, reasonable temperature changes and additional espresso shots. Starbucks also offers blended beverages, such as the "Frappuccino Blended Coffee", a flavored drink of coffee, milk, and sugar blended with ice. The name is a portmanteau of frappé and cappuccino and was introduced in 1995. Starbucks markets seasonal beverages as well, such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte (Thanksgiving) Gingerbread Latte, Peppermint Mocha, Eggnog Latte (Christmas) and Leprechaun Latte (St. Patrick's Day). There is also seasonal brewed coffee, like the "Christmas Blend" of whole bean coffee. Starbucks supplements the beverage offerings with pastries, salads, cold sandwiches, coffee merchandise and at-home brewing equipment, and pre-packed or scooped coffee beans. Starbucks also has a variety of kosher products, but due to business hours and sandwich products a Starbucks retail store cannot be certified 'kosher' according to Jewish law.[10] Starbucks does not franchise with individuals within North America but does enter into licensing arrangements with some companies.[11] One example is of Starbucks store locations in airports, most of which are operated by HMSHost, owned by the Italian Autogrill group. Other licensed locations include grocery stores, major food services corporations, college and university campuses, and hospitals. In addition, Starbucks has partnered with Magic Johnson's Johnson Development Corporation to form Urban Coffee Opportunities, which opens retail locations in low-income urban areas.[12] [edit] Staffing There are usually from two to six partners (as Starbucks employees are called), all of them trained baristas, in each retail store at any one time. Black aprons labeled "Coffee Master" are worn by employees who have completed the Coffee Master course, which educates employees in not only the tasting, but also growing regions, roasting and purchasing (including fair trade practices) aspects of the coffee industry. In the United States and Canada Starbucks offers full benefits such as health, dental, and vision insurance, as well as stock-option grants and 401k with matching to employees who work an average of at least 20 hours per week. Each employee can receive a box of tea or a pound of coffee each week if they choose. As of 2008, Starbucks was ranked by Fortune magazine as the 7th best company to work for in the United States, up from 16th in 2007. In 2006 and 2005 it was ranked 29th and 11th, respectively.[13] Starbucks was also voted as one of the top ten UK workplaces by the Financial Times in 2007. [edit] "The Third Place" Starbucks in Frankfurt am Main, GermanyStarbucks envisions local outlets as a "third place" (besides home and work) to spend time, and store design is intended to achieve this. The café section of the store is often outfitted with stuffed chairs and tables with hard-backed chairs. Most stores provide free electricity for customers, and many stores also provide wireless internet access (provided in American stores by T-Mobile[14] and in Canadian stores by Bell Mobility[15]) The company is noted for its non-smoking policy at almost all of its outlets, despite predictions that this would never succeed in markets such as Germany, which used to have few restrictions on smoking. This has changed in 2007 with many German states issuing smoking bans for restaurants and bars. Outlets in Vienna and Mexico City, which have smoking rooms separated by double doors from the coffee shop itself, and a smoking room upstairs in the Largo do Senado, Macau, branch are the closest the company has come to making exceptions. According to the company, the smoking ban is to ensure that the coffee aroma is not adulterated. The company also asks its employees to refrain from wearing strong perfumes for similar reasons.[16] Starbucks generally does not prohibit smoking in outside seating areas, unless required by local codes. [edit] International operations Countries that contain Starbucks stores A typical sales area, this one in Peterborough, UK, showing a display of food and the beverage preparation area Starbucks inside Tsutaya in Shibuya, JapanStores are now found in Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia[17], Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. New stores will be opened in Argentina[18], Bulgaria[19] , Colombia[20], Hungary[21], India, Iraq, Morocco, Poland[22], Portugal[23], Serbia and South Africa. [edit] Intellectual property Starbucks U.S. Brands, LLC, is a Starbucks-owned company that currently holds and owns the property rights to approximately 120 Starbucks Coffee Company patents and trademarks. It is located at 2525 Starbucks Way in Minden, Nevada.[24] [edit] Name The company is named in part after Starbuck, Captain Ahab's first mate in the book Moby-Dick, as well as a turn-of-the-century mining camp (Starbo or Storbo) on Mount Rainier. According to Howard Schultz's book Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time, the name of the company was derived from Moby-Dick, although not in as direct a fashion as many assume. Gordon Bowker liked the name "Pequod" (the ship in the novel), but his creative partner Terry Heckler responded, "No one's going to drink a cup of Pee-quod!" Heckler suggested "Starbo." Brainstorming with these two ideas resulted in the company being named for the Pequod's first mate, Starbuck.[25] International names include: Arabic-speaking countries: ??????? (transliteration: starbaks) China, Hong Kong, Taiwan: ??? Pinyin: xingbakè (? xing means "star", while ?ba ?kè is a transliteration of "-bucks") Israel: ??????? (transliteration: s?arbaqs) Japan: ??????? (transliteration: sutabakkusu, phonological: staa-bahkss) South Korea: ???? (transliteration: seutabeokseu), often used in conjunction with the English name Quebec, Canada: Café Starbucks Coffee[26] (added the French word to avoid controversy with local language politics) Thailand: ?????????? pronounced [sota?bak?o] [edit] Logo The logo is a "twin-tailed siren" (the siren of Greek mythology).[27] The logo has been significantly streamlined over the years. In the first version, which gave the impression of an authentic 18th century European woodcut, the Starbucks siren was topless and had a fully-visible double fish tail. The image also had a rough visual texture. In the second version, her chest was covered by her flowing hair, but her navel was still visible, and the fish tail was cropped slightly. In the current version, her navel and chest are not visible at all, and only vestiges remain of the fish tails. The original "woodcut" logo can still be seen on the Starbucks store in Seattle's Pike Place Market, and on certain coffee bags. At the beginning of September 2006, Starbucks temporarily reintroduced its original brown logo on paper hot drink cups. Starbucks has stated that this was done to show the company's heritage from the Pacific Northwest and to celebrate 35 years of business. The vintage logo has sparked some controversy due to the siren's bare chest. Recently, an elementary school principal in Kent, Washington, was reported as asking teachers to "cover up" the mermaid of the retro cups with a cup sleeve of some kind.[27] [edit] Parodies and infringements In 2000, San Francisco cartoonist Kieron Dwyer was sued by Starbucks for copyright and trademark infringement after creating a parody of its siren logo and putting it on coffee mugs, t-shirts, and stickers that he sold on his website and at comic book conventions. Dwyer felt that since his work was a parody it was protected by his right to free speech under U.S. law. The judge agreed that Dwyer's work was a parody and thus enjoyed constitutional protection; however, he was forbidden from financially "profiting" from using a "confusingly similar" image of the Starbucks siren logo. Dwyer is currently allowed to display the image as an expression of free speech, but he can no longer sell it.[28] In 2003, Starbucks successfully sued a Shanghai competitor in China for trademark infringement, because that chain used a green-and-white logo with a similar sounding Chinese name.[29] Also in 2003, Starbucks sent a cease-and-desist letter to "HaidaBucks Coffee House" in Masset, British Columbia, Canada. The store was owned by a group of young Haida men, commonly referred to as "bucks." After facing criticism, Starbucks dropped its demand after HaidaBucks dropped "coffee house" from its name.[30] In 2005 Starbucks lost a trademark infringement case against a smaller coffee vendor in South Korea that operates coffee stations under the name and style Starpreya. The company, Elpreya, says Starpreya is named after the Norse goddess, Freja, with the letters of that name changed to ease pronunciation by Koreans. The court rejected the Seattle-based retailer's claim that the logo of Starpreya is too similar to the famous Starbucks logo.[31] [edit] Criticism and controversy Starbucks has come to be regarded by some, particularly in the global justice movement, as symbolic of the problems posed by globalization. Several activist groups maintain websites criticizing the company's fair-trade policies, labor relations, and environmental impact, and hold it as a prime example of U.S. cultural and economic imperialism. Several Starbucks locations were vandalized during the WTO meeting held in Seattle in late 1999. Although no organization claimed responsibility for the vandalism, the anarchist circle-A symbol was spray-painted on several stores.[32] [edit] Cultural imperialism Starbucks at the Forbidden City in Beijing (closed since July 2007)The Starbucks location in the former imperial palace in Beijing closed in July 2007. The coffee shop had been a source of ongoing controversy since its opening in 2000 with protesters objecting that the presence of the American chain in this location "was trampling on Chinese culture".[33][34][35][36] [edit] Anti-competitive tactics Some of the methods Starbucks has used to expand and maintain their dominant market position, such as buying out competitors' leases, acquiring independent coffee shops and converting them into Starbucks stores, and clustering several locations in a small geographical area (i.e., saturating the market), have been labeled anti-competitive by critics.[37] For example, Starbucks fueled its initial expansion into the UK market with a buyout of its only major potential competitor (the 49 outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company), then used its capital and influence to obtain prime locations, some of which operated at a financial loss. Critics claimed this was an unfair attempt to drive out small, independent competitors, who could not afford to pay inflated prices for premium real estate.[38] [edit] Labor disputes Since 2004, workers at seven Starbucks stores in New York City have joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) as the Starbucks Workers Union.[39] According to a Starbucks Union press release, since then, the union membership has begun expanding to Chicago and Maryland.[40] On March 7, 2006, the IWW and Starbucks agreed to a National Labor Relations Board settlement in which three Starbucks workers were granted almost US$2,000 in back wages and two fired employees were offered reinstatement.[41][42][43] According to the Starbucks Union, on November 24, 2006, IWW members picketed Starbucks locations in more than 50 cities around the world in countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain and New Zealand, as well as U.S. cities including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco,[44] to protest the firing of five Starbucks Workers Union organizers by Starbucks and to demand their reinstatement. Some Starbucks baristas in Canada,[45] Australia and New Zealand,[46] and the United States[47] belong to a variety of unions. In 2005, Starbucks paid out US$165,000 to eight employees at its Kent, Washington, roasting plant to settle charges that they had been retaliated against for being pro-union. At the time, the plant workers were represented by the IUOE. Starbucks admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement.[39] A Starbucks strike occurred in Auckland, New Zealand, on November 23, 2005.[46] Organized by Unite Union, workers sought secure hours, a minimum wage of NZ$12 an hour, and the abolition of youth rates. The company settled with the Union in 2006, resulting in pay increases, increased security of hours, and an improvement in youth rates.[48] According to Starbucks Chairman Howard Schulz, "If they had faith in me and my motives, they wouldn't need a union." According to The Seattle Times, "The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 286 had trouble with Starbucks at its Kent roasting plant, where the union no longer represents workers".[39] [edit] Coffee bean market In 2000, the company introduced a line of fair trade products.[49] Of the approximately 136,000 tonnes (300 million pounds) of coffee Starbucks purchased in 2006, about 6 percent was certified as fair trade.[50] According to Starbucks, they purchased 2,180 tonnes (4.8 million pounds) of Certified Fair Trade coffee in fiscal year 2004 and 5,220 tonnes (11.5 million pounds) in 2005. They have become the largest buyer of Certified Fair Trade coffee in North America (10% of the global market). Transfair USA,[51] the only third-party certifier of Fair Trade Certified coffee in the United States, has noted the impact Starbucks has made in the area of Fair Trade and coffee farmer's lives by saying: Since launching {its} FTC coffee line in 2000, Starbucks has undeniably made a significant contribution to family farmers through their rapidly growing FTC coffee volume. By offering FTC coffee in thousands of stores, Starbucks has also given the FTC label greater visibility, helping to raise consumer awareness in the process. Groups such as Global Exchange are calling for Starbucks to further increase its sales of fair trade coffees. However, fair trade certification can cost US$20,000 to US$30,000[citation needed], and many growers are unwilling or unable to pay for certification[citation needed]. [edit] Ethos water controversy Ethos, a brand of bottled water acquired by Starbucks in 2005, is sold at locations throughout North America. Ethos bottles feature prominent labeling stating "helping children get clean water", referring to the fact that $.05 from each $1.80USD bottle sold ($.10 per unit in Canada) is used to fund clean water projects in under-developed areas. Critics have argued that the claim on the label misleads consumers into thinking that Ethos is primarily a charitable organization, when it is actually a for-profit Starbucks brand and the vast majority of the sale price (over 94%) does not support clean-water projects.[52] Although sales of Ethos water has raised over $4,000,000 for clean water efforts, the brand is not a charity and has added to Starbucks revenue.[53] The founders of Ethos have stated that the brand is intended to raise awareness of third-world clean water issues and provide socially responsible consumers with an opportunity to support the cause by choosing Ethos over other brands.[54] Starbucks has since redesigned the American version of the Ethos water bottles, stating the amount of money donated per bottle in the description. [edit] Recycled paper cups In 2006, Starbucks introduced cups made with 10 percent recycled material. With 1.5 billion cups used annually in the United States at that time, the change was estimated to save approximately five million pounds of virgin tree fiber a year. Prior to the announcement, Starbucks used recycled paper into its cardboard cup sleeves, napkins, and cardboard carriers. A major obstacle for the recycled paper cup was that recycled content had never before been used in direct contact with food, especially not with steaming hot beverages. Although permission was not required, Starbucks and its pulp manufacturer, the Mississippi River Corporation, decided to seek Food and Drug Administration approval for the new cups. Had Starbucks not bothered to get F.D.A. approval, the cup development process would have taken only three months instead of more than two years. Starbucks said it was the first time that a national food chain had incorporated recycled material into packaging that comes into direct contact with food or beverages, but critics claim that the company should be doing much more to protect the environment.[55][56] [edit] Other ventures Main article: Hear Music Starbucks entered the music industry in 1999 with the acquisition of Hear Music, and the film industry in 2006 with the creation of Starbucks Entertainment. Starbucks Entertainment was one of the producers of the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee. Retail stores heavily advertised the film before its release. Hear Music is the brand name of Starbucks' retail music concept. Hear Music began as a catalog company in 1990 and was purchased by Starbucks in 1999. Nearly three years later, in 2002, they produced a Starbucks opera album, featuring artists such as Luciano Pavarotti. [edit] Starbucks and Apple Starbucks has entered into a partnership with Apple to collaborate on selling music as part of the coffeehouse experience. In October of 2006, Apple added a Starbucks Entertainment area to the iTunes Music Store, selling similar music that appeared in Starbucks stores. In September of 2007 Apple announced that there would be wireless communication between Apple and Starbucks. Through the T-Mobile Wi-Fi, a paywall is opened up to allow any individual connecting to T-Mobile Hotspot access to the iTunes Music Store (regardless of whether he or she is a T-Mobile Hotspot subscriber). The partnership is primarily targeted at iPhone, iPod Touch, and Macbook users (although anyone with access to iTunes can take advantage of it). In addition, the iTunes Music Store will automatically detect the current and last 10 songs playing in a Starbucks and offer users connected to the store's wireless network the opportunity to download the tracks. This feature has been rolled out in Seattle, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area, and will slowly be offered in limited markets during 2007-2008.[57] During the fall of 2007 Starbucks also began to sell digital downloads of certain albums through iTunes. The buyer would buy the download at Starbucks, and enter the code on the download card at the iTunes Music Store, and then the entire album would immediately start downloading. From October 2 to November 7, 2007, Starbucks gave away 37 different songs for free download through iTunes as part of the "Song of the Day" promotion. Each day, baristas would give out download cards for a particular song which could be redeemed on [edit] See also List of coffeehouse chains
menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Like many other fruits, coffee cherries grow on trees. Here are some interesting facts about coffee trees: Coffee trees are indigenous to Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula. They were transplanted to other parts of the world by Dutch merchants and other explorers. Some coffee trees have the potential to grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet. However, most are kept much shorter for ease of harvest. The average coffee tree bears enough cherries each season to produce between 1 and 1½ pounds of roasted coffee. The soil, climate, altitude, and surrounding plants that a coffee tree is exposed to during growth affect the flavor of the beans it produces. Arabica vs. Robusta Coffee Beans - There are two commercially important coffee species: coffea arabica and coffea canephora (robusta). Arabica coffee (about 75 percent of world production) grows best at high altitudes, has a much more refined flavor than other species, and contains about 1 percent caffeine by weight. As the name indicates, robusta coffee is a robust species, resistant to disease, with a high yield per plant. It flourishes at lower elevations and produces coffee with harsher flavor characteristics. Starbucks buys only the highest quality arabica coffees available, beans whose flavor develops fully through the Starbucks Roast®. Harvesting Coffee. Every year in November and December, coffee farmers all over the world are Harvesting Coffee. Beneath the canopy Coffee grown in the shade. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced At harvest time, coffee trees are laden with bright red coffee cherries. Ripe coffee cherries are cranberry. An unroasted coffee bean is simply the pit of the coffee cherry. The skin of the coffee cherry is very thick, with a slightly bitter flavor. The fruit beneath the skin, however, is intensely sweet. The texture of this layer of fruit is similar to a grape. Beneath the fruit is the parchment, covered with a thin, slippery, honey-like layer called "mucilage." The parchment of the coffee cherry serves as a protective pocket for the seed, much like the small pockets that protect the seeds of an apple. Removing the parchment, two translucent bluish green coffee beans are revealed, coated with a very thin layer called the "silverskin."While most coffee cherries contain two beans, 5 to 10 percent of the time, only one bean is produced in the cherry. This is called a "peaberry." Buying Coffee for Starbucks A highly selective process that is based on its performance in the cup, Buying Coffee for Starbucks is a unique job. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The perfect cup starts with the best beans Finding and purchasing the best green beans in the world is the first step that differentiates Starbucks® Coffee from the rest of the coffee industry. Starbucks is well-known for its exceptionally high quality coffees, care in selection, and expertise in roast. Each coffee is selected for the defining qualities that distinguish its origin. This careful selection process illustrates Starbucks passion for buying and roasting the world's best coffee. Coffee is a huge business. In fact, coffee is the second most valuable commodity after oil. We comb the world for the perfect combination of climate, soil, elevation, and agricultural practices that come together to produce a great coffee. When searching for coffees, the only question for Starbucks is this: Which coffees from a given location best represent the perfect intersection of climate and skilled horticulture? It is a search for unmistakable regional flavors, what a French wine-maker would call goût de terroir, the taste of the place. At Starbucks, coffee is a fresh produce, not a commodity. When the inevitable happens and a given coffee estate or region has an "off" year, we simply don't offer that coffee. We make this tough decision rather than offering a lower quality selection to our valued customers. We buy coffee solely on its performance in the cup. The coffee we buy is truly special, spectacular coffee. The coffee buying team evaluates over one thousand "offer samples" each year. The evaluation process includes roasting small batches of coffee and tasting these batches in a process called "cupping." Only a very few of these sampled coffees make it into our warehouses. Starbucks coffee buyers spend approximately 18 weeks per year traveling to countries of origin. The purpose of these travels is not to directly buy coffee. The goal is to continue to learn about coffee and to strengthen relationships with growers and suppliers. These relationships are critical to our future success - they solidify our role as champions of quality and progress at every level of the coffee business. It is because of these relationships that Starbucks gets the first pick of the best crops worldwide. To blend or not to blend Some of the most interesting tastes are a result of Coffee Blending. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We think learning about coffee is a never-ending journey At Starbucks we provide an expert level of coffee education to our partners as well as our customers. The Coffee department employs a team of Coffee Education Specialists who act as the eyes and ears of the coffee buyers for the rest of the company. We understand that developing a wide range of knowledge about coffee is a long process. Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists help train our field partners on an ongoing basis to keep them connected with the core of our business. Coffee Education Specialists have kept this interesting by: Holding traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremonies Conducting scientific aroma and sensory labs Facilitating tasting seminars Sponsoring coffee beverage contests Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists also help our business strategists stay connected with what partners and customers are saying. They play a pivotal role in keeping partners across all levels of the company inspired about our core product. This inspiration and enthusiasm is what ultimately creates a wonderful experience for our customers. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu boardcoffee education black apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Buy it online Black Apron Exclusives™ are also available online at StarbucksStore.com. We Want to Hear from You Tell us what you think about Black Apron Exclusives™ coffees. menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced So, you want to be a coffee expert? Join our experts for Coffee Conversations, a unique audio series exploring the world of coffee. Hosts Scott McMartin and Aileen Carrell take you to "Coffee College" and invite special guests to share their perspectives on topics such as entertaining with coffee, Fair Trade, coffee composting, home brewing and selecting the coffee beans that end up in your cup. Sit back, take a sip, and enjoy Coffee Conversations with Starbucks. Subscribe to RSS Feed Download | More Info Sommelier compares wine and coffee tasting C.A.F.E. Practices discussion with Conservation International Responses to Kona and flavored coffee questions Download | More Info A lesson in Coffee Speak An expert's take on entertaining with coffee Pairing coffee with food Download | More Info Coffee 101 A conversation with coffee farmers Meet Starbucks baristas Experience "coffee cupping" with a tasting expert Download Starbucks very first audio series dedicated to the exploration and appreciation of coffee, developed to help us celebrate our 35th anniversary. beverage lineuphear musiclocal eventsnutrition informationbrewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced 600 miles600 miles© 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ © 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ 2D3DRoadAerialHybridBird's eye See this location in bird's eye view Come to the coffeehouse Looking for a Starbucks? Our Store Locator will find one in your neighborhood or one along the way while you’re traveling. Looking for some fun? Live music. Book readings. Coffee seminars. There’s a lot going on inside at Starbucks. Find events happening near you. And invite a friend to meet. Magic in the air Find out more about what’s playing in our coffeehouses and check out our wireless locations. Find store Find route Find event Find Starbucks coffeehouses near Please enter a location. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon From Please enter a starting location. To Please enter a destination. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon Find events near Please enter a location. Between these dates & Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Event type All Events Art/Craft Book Reading/Book Club Charitable or Volunteer Event Coffee Seminar/Festival/Tasting Community Event Environment Film Holiday Job Fair Kids Music New Store Opening Other Sports/Fitness Walk Starbucks Sampling Hold down CTRL while clicking to select more than one event type. Find a Starbucks with your mobile phone Just type starbucks.com in your phone’s browser and access our Store Locator formatted for easy viewing. *Carrier charges may apply. buy a cardcustomize a cardreload a cardregister a cardduetto™ visa®corporate salessite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account A coffee break on a Card A Starbucks Card is the easiest way for you – or someone you know – to enjoy Starbucks. How can we help you today? Here's where you can register it, reload it and check your balance. Check your Card balance Card number Register your Starbucks Card more info Reload your Starbucks Card more info Reload someone else's Card more info Set up Auto-reload for yourself more info Set up Auto-reload for someone else more info Manage your Card account more info It's a thoughtful gift for someone (even if that someone is you). Buy a Card more info Customize a Card more info Corporate Sales more info Questions? Please see our list of Frequently Asked Questions. Please read our Terms and Conditions of Use. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. coffeeice creamstarbucks doubleshot®starbucks iced coffeefrappuccino® beveragestazo teasstarbucks™ liqueurssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The quality of Starbucks…the convenience of your grocery store Whether it's whole bean coffee, Frappuccino® coffee drink, or our delectable ice cream, you're sure to get Starbucks superior quality wherever you shop. Starbucks® Coffee Starbucks® House Blend, Sumatra, Caffè Verona®. Just three of the many varieties of Starbucks® coffees that are now available where you buy groceries. Starbucks® Ice Cream Love at first bite! Made from the finest ingredients, Starbucks® ice creams come in an array of flavors, and are a perfect treat any time. Frappuccino® Coffee Drink We took a great thing and made it even better. Now you can have a delicious, creamy Frappuccino® coffee drink any time, anywhere. It gets you going Start your day with a Starbucks DoubleShot®. Perfect for those of you who take your coffee to go. The delicious combination of Starbucks espresso and rich cream conveniently packaged for your busy lifestyle. Bring on the day! Questions or comments? Contact us Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. office coffee servicestarbucks card corporate salesfoodservicesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced A smart move. Bringing one of the world's most admired brands into your business is good for them and good for you! To offer Starbucks coffee in your break room, click here To offer Starbucks in your cafeteria, employee dining venue or catering program, click here To purchase Starbucks Cards for your employees or clients, click here The Gift of Starbucks Whether you’re thanking a faithful client or rewarding a job well done, the Starbucks Card is the perfect gift for every business occasion. Increasing the value Enhance your customers’ experience with the quality of Starbucks® coffee and Tazo® Tea. Hotels Colleges and Universities Business and Industry Cafeterias Healthcare Other Foodservice Venues Find out more Note: Not all programs are available outside of the continental United States. Get Starbucks coffee delivered to your office, no matter what size. Large or small, Starbucks Office Coffee has a solution for your office coffee and tea needs. Choose from a variety of Starbucks® coffees and Tazo® teas, in addition to other breakroom needs such as hot cocoa, Starbucks branded paper products and amenities. Find out more. A qualified high volume/high traffic retail or foodservice operation can own and operate a Starbucks licensed store. Examples include: hotels and resorts, healthcare, college and university campus environments and business and industry. Find out more. World Water Day Let's get the word out about clean, safe drinking water. Discover Now. Decaf Espresso Roast Smooth, balanced, with a sweet caramel finish. Discover Now. the companyinvestor relationscareer centerpress roomsocial responsibilityinternational storesrumor responsesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The bottom line We always figured that putting people before products just made good common sense. So far, it’s been working out for us. Our relationships with farmers yield the highest quality coffees. The connections we make in communities create a loyal following. And the support we provide our baristas pays off everyday. Read more about our unusually human approach to business in the 2006 Corporate Social Responsibility Annual Report. Thank you for your interest in Starbucks Coffee Company Find out more about us through: Our Mission Statement Investor Relations Our Corporate Social Responsibility department. Annual Meeting of Shareholders. The latest developments and up-to-date news at Starbucks Starbucks Espresso Training Delivers on the Promise of the Best Customer Experience Howard Schultz Transformation Agenda Communication #8 Love What You Do. Click here to see all our current job opportunities. Read it here Our Fiscal 2007 Year in Review. Now available online. We're proud to be on the list We're proud to be among FORTUNE's 100 Best Places to Work. site map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced
menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Like many other fruits, coffee cherries grow on trees. Here are some interesting facts about coffee trees: Coffee trees are indigenous to Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula. They were transplanted to other parts of the world by Dutch merchants and other explorers. Some coffee trees have the potential to grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet. However, most are kept much shorter for ease of harvest. The average coffee tree bears enough cherries each season to produce between 1 and 1½ pounds of roasted coffee. The soil, climate, altitude, and surrounding plants that a coffee tree is exposed to during growth affect the flavor of the beans it produces. Arabica vs. Robusta Coffee Beans - There are two commercially important coffee species: coffea arabica and coffea canephora (robusta). Arabica coffee (about 75 percent of world production) grows best at high altitudes, has a much more refined flavor than other species, and contains about 1 percent caffeine by weight. As the name indicates, robusta coffee is a robust species, resistant to disease, with a high yield per plant. It flourishes at lower elevations and produces coffee with harsher flavor characteristics. Starbucks buys only the highest quality arabica coffees available, beans whose flavor develops fully through the Starbucks Roast®. Harvesting Coffee. Every year in November and December, coffee farmers all over the world are Harvesting Coffee. Beneath the canopy Coffee grown in the shade. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced At harvest time, coffee trees are laden with bright red coffee cherries. Ripe coffee cherries are cranberry. An unroasted coffee bean is simply the pit of the coffee cherry. The skin of the coffee cherry is very thick, with a slightly bitter flavor. The fruit beneath the skin, however, is intensely sweet. The texture of this layer of fruit is similar to a grape. Beneath the fruit is the parchment, covered with a thin, slippery, honey-like layer called "mucilage." The parchment of the coffee cherry serves as a protective pocket for the seed, much like the small pockets that protect the seeds of an apple. Removing the parchment, two translucent bluish green coffee beans are revealed, coated with a very thin layer called the "silverskin."While most coffee cherries contain two beans, 5 to 10 percent of the time, only one bean is produced in the cherry. This is called a "peaberry." Buying Coffee for Starbucks A highly selective process that is based on its performance in the cup, Buying Coffee for Starbucks is a unique job. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The perfect cup starts with the best beans Finding and purchasing the best green beans in the world is the first step that differentiates Starbucks® Coffee from the rest of the coffee industry. Starbucks is well-known for its exceptionally high quality coffees, care in selection, and expertise in roast. Each coffee is selected for the defining qualities that distinguish its origin. This careful selection process illustrates Starbucks passion for buying and roasting the world's best coffee. Coffee is a huge business. In fact, coffee is the second most valuable commodity after oil. We comb the world for the perfect combination of climate, soil, elevation, and agricultural practices that come together to produce a great coffee. When searching for coffees, the only question for Starbucks is this: Which coffees from a given location best represent the perfect intersection of climate and skilled horticulture? It is a search for unmistakable regional flavors, what a French wine-maker would call goût de terroir, the taste of the place. At Starbucks, coffee is a fresh produce, not a commodity. When the inevitable happens and a given coffee estate or region has an "off" year, we simply don't offer that coffee. We make this tough decision rather than offering a lower quality selection to our valued customers. We buy coffee solely on its performance in the cup. The coffee we buy is truly special, spectacular coffee. The coffee buying team evaluates over one thousand "offer samples" each year. The evaluation process includes roasting small batches of coffee and tasting these batches in a process called "cupping." Only a very few of these sampled coffees make it into our warehouses. Starbucks coffee buyers spend approximately 18 weeks per year traveling to countries of origin. The purpose of these travels is not to directly buy coffee. The goal is to continue to learn about coffee and to strengthen relationships with growers and suppliers. These relationships are critical to our future success - they solidify our role as champions of quality and progress at every level of the coffee business. It is because of these relationships that Starbucks gets the first pick of the best crops worldwide. To blend or not to blend Some of the most interesting tastes are a result of Coffee Blending. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We think learning about coffee is a never-ending journey At Starbucks we provide an expert level of coffee education to our partners as well as our customers. The Coffee department employs a team of Coffee Education Specialists who act as the eyes and ears of the coffee buyers for the rest of the company. We understand that developing a wide range of knowledge about coffee is a long process. Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists help train our field partners on an ongoing basis to keep them connected with the core of our business. Coffee Education Specialists have kept this interesting by: Holding traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremonies Conducting scientific aroma and sensory labs Facilitating tasting seminars Sponsoring coffee beverage contests Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists also help our business strategists stay connected with what partners and customers are saying. They play a pivotal role in keeping partners across all levels of the company inspired about our core product. This inspiration and enthusiasm is what ultimately creates a wonderful experience for our customers. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu boardcoffee education black apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Buy it online Black Apron Exclusives™ are also available online at StarbucksStore.com. We Want to Hear from You Tell us what you think about Black Apron Exclusives™ coffees. menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced So, you want to be a coffee expert? Join our experts for Coffee Conversations, a unique audio series exploring the world of coffee. Hosts Scott McMartin and Aileen Carrell take you to "Coffee College" and invite special guests to share their perspectives on topics such as entertaining with coffee, Fair Trade, coffee composting, home brewing and selecting the coffee beans that end up in your cup. Sit back, take a sip, and enjoy Coffee Conversations with Starbucks. Subscribe to RSS Feed Download | More Info Sommelier compares wine and coffee tasting C.A.F.E. Practices discussion with Conservation International Responses to Kona and flavored coffee questions Download | More Info A lesson in Coffee Speak An expert's take on entertaining with coffee Pairing coffee with food Download | More Info Coffee 101 A conversation with coffee farmers Meet Starbucks baristas Experience "coffee cupping" with a tasting expert Download Starbucks very first audio series dedicated to the exploration and appreciation of coffee, developed to help us celebrate our 35th anniversary. beverage lineuphear musiclocal eventsnutrition informationbrewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced 600 miles600 miles© 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ © 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ 2D3DRoadAerialHybridBird's eye See this location in bird's eye view Come to the coffeehouse Looking for a Starbucks? Our Store Locator will find one in your neighborhood or one along the way while you’re traveling. Looking for some fun? Live music. Book readings. Coffee seminars. There’s a lot going on inside at Starbucks. Find events happening near you. And invite a friend to meet. Magic in the air Find out more about what’s playing in our coffeehouses and check out our wireless locations. Find store Find route Find event Find Starbucks coffeehouses near Please enter a location. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon From Please enter a starting location. To Please enter a destination. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon Find events near Please enter a location. Between these dates & Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Event type All Events Art/Craft Book Reading/Book Club Charitable or Volunteer Event Coffee Seminar/Festival/Tasting Community Event Environment Film Holiday Job Fair Kids Music New Store Opening Other Sports/Fitness Walk Starbucks Sampling Hold down CTRL while clicking to select more than one event type. Find a Starbucks with your mobile phone Just type starbucks.com in your phone’s browser and access our Store Locator formatted for easy viewing. *Carrier charges may apply. buy a cardcustomize a cardreload a cardregister a cardduetto™ visa®corporate salessite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account A coffee break on a Card A Starbucks Card is the easiest way for you – or someone you know – to enjoy Starbucks. How can we help you today? Here's where you can register it, reload it and check your balance. Check your Card balance Card number Register your Starbucks Card more info Reload your Starbucks Card more info Reload someone else's Card more info Set up Auto-reload for yourself more info Set up Auto-reload for someone else more info Manage your Card account more info It's a thoughtful gift for someone (even if that someone is you). Buy a Card more info Customize a Card more info Corporate Sales more info Questions? Please see our list of Frequently Asked Questions. Please read our Terms and Conditions of Use. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. coffeeice creamstarbucks doubleshot®starbucks iced coffeefrappuccino® beveragestazo teasstarbucks™ liqueurssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The quality of Starbucks…the convenience of your grocery store Whether it's whole bean coffee, Frappuccino® coffee drink, or our delectable ice cream, you're sure to get Starbucks superior quality wherever you shop. Starbucks® Coffee Starbucks® House Blend, Sumatra, Caffè Verona®. Just three of the many varieties of Starbucks® coffees that are now available where you buy groceries. Starbucks® Ice Cream Love at first bite! Made from the finest ingredients, Starbucks® ice creams come in an array of flavors, and are a perfect treat any time. Frappuccino® Coffee Drink We took a great thing and made it even better. Now you can have a delicious, creamy Frappuccino® coffee drink any time, anywhere. It gets you going Start your day with a Starbucks DoubleShot®. Perfect for those of you who take your coffee to go. The delicious combination of Starbucks espresso and rich cream conveniently packaged for your busy lifestyle. Bring on the day! Questions or comments? Contact us Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. office coffee servicestarbucks card corporate salesfoodservicesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced A smart move. Bringing one of the world's most admired brands into your business is good for them and good for you! To offer Starbucks coffee in your break room, click here To offer Starbucks in your cafeteria, employee dining venue or catering program, click here To purchase Starbucks Cards for your employees or clients, click here The Gift of Starbucks Whether you’re thanking a faithful client or rewarding a job well done, the Starbucks Card is the perfect gift for every business occasion. Increasing the value Enhance your customers’ experience with the quality of Starbucks® coffee and Tazo® Tea. Hotels Colleges and Universities Business and Industry Cafeterias Healthcare Other Foodservice Venues Find out more Note: Not all programs are available outside of the continental United States. Get Starbucks coffee delivered to your office, no matter what size. Large or small, Starbucks Office Coffee has a solution for your office coffee and tea needs. Choose from a variety of Starbucks® coffees and Tazo® teas, in addition to other breakroom needs such as hot cocoa, Starbucks branded paper products and amenities. Find out more. A qualified high volume/high traffic retail or foodservice operation can own and operate a Starbucks licensed store. Examples include: hotels and resorts, healthcare, college and university campus environments and business and industry. Find out more. World Water Day Let's get the word out about clean, safe drinking water. Discover Now. Decaf Espresso Roast Smooth, balanced, with a sweet caramel finish. Discover Now. the companyinvestor relationscareer centerpress roomsocial responsibilityinternational storesrumor responsesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The bottom line We always figured that putting people before products just made good common sense. So far, it’s been working out for us. Our relationships with farmers yield the highest quality coffees. The connections we make in communities create a loyal following. And the support we provide our baristas pays off everyday. Read more about our unusually human approach to business in the 2006 Corporate Social Responsibility Annual Report. Thank you for your interest in Starbucks Coffee Company Find out more about us through: Our Mission Statement Investor Relations Our Corporate Social Responsibility department. Annual Meeting of Shareholders. The latest developments and up-to-date news at Starbucks Starbucks Espresso Training Delivers on the Promise of the Best Customer Experience Howard Schultz Transformation Agenda Communication #8 Love What You Do. Click here to see all our current job opportunities. Read it here Our Fiscal 2007 Year in Review. Now available online. We're proud to be on the list We're proud to be among FORTUNE's 100 Best Places to Work. site map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced
menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Like many other fruits, coffee cherries grow on trees. Here are some interesting facts about coffee trees: Coffee trees are indigenous to Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula. They were transplanted to other parts of the world by Dutch merchants and other explorers. Some coffee trees have the potential to grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet. However, most are kept much shorter for ease of harvest. The average coffee tree bears enough cherries each season to produce between 1 and 1½ pounds of roasted coffee. The soil, climate, altitude, and surrounding plants that a coffee tree is exposed to during growth affect the flavor of the beans it produces. Arabica vs. Robusta Coffee Beans - There are two commercially important coffee species: coffea arabica and coffea canephora (robusta). Arabica coffee (about 75 percent of world production) grows best at high altitudes, has a much more refined flavor than other species, and contains about 1 percent caffeine by weight. As the name indicates, robusta coffee is a robust species, resistant to disease, with a high yield per plant. It flourishes at lower elevations and produces coffee with harsher flavor characteristics. Starbucks buys only the highest quality arabica coffees available, beans whose flavor develops fully through the Starbucks Roast®. Harvesting Coffee. Every year in November and December, coffee farmers all over the world are Harvesting Coffee. Beneath the canopy Coffee grown in the shade. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced At harvest time, coffee trees are laden with bright red coffee cherries. Ripe coffee cherries are cranberry. An unroasted coffee bean is simply the pit of the coffee cherry. The skin of the coffee cherry is very thick, with a slightly bitter flavor. The fruit beneath the skin, however, is intensely sweet. The texture of this layer of fruit is similar to a grape. Beneath the fruit is the parchment, covered with a thin, slippery, honey-like layer called "mucilage." The parchment of the coffee cherry serves as a protective pocket for the seed, much like the small pockets that protect the seeds of an apple. Removing the parchment, two translucent bluish green coffee beans are revealed, coated with a very thin layer called the "silverskin."While most coffee cherries contain two beans, 5 to 10 percent of the time, only one bean is produced in the cherry. This is called a "peaberry." Buying Coffee for Starbucks A highly selective process that is based on its performance in the cup, Buying Coffee for Starbucks is a unique job. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The perfect cup starts with the best beans Finding and purchasing the best green beans in the world is the first step that differentiates Starbucks® Coffee from the rest of the coffee industry. Starbucks is well-known for its exceptionally high quality coffees, care in selection, and expertise in roast. Each coffee is selected for the defining qualities that distinguish its origin. This careful selection process illustrates Starbucks passion for buying and roasting the world's best coffee. Coffee is a huge business. In fact, coffee is the second most valuable commodity after oil. We comb the world for the perfect combination of climate, soil, elevation, and agricultural practices that come together to produce a great coffee. When searching for coffees, the only question for Starbucks is this: Which coffees from a given location best represent the perfect intersection of climate and skilled horticulture? It is a search for unmistakable regional flavors, what a French wine-maker would call goût de terroir, the taste of the place. At Starbucks, coffee is a fresh produce, not a commodity. When the inevitable happens and a given coffee estate or region has an "off" year, we simply don't offer that coffee. We make this tough decision rather than offering a lower quality selection to our valued customers. We buy coffee solely on its performance in the cup. The coffee we buy is truly special, spectacular coffee. The coffee buying team evaluates over one thousand "offer samples" each year. The evaluation process includes roasting small batches of coffee and tasting these batches in a process called "cupping." Only a very few of these sampled coffees make it into our warehouses. Starbucks coffee buyers spend approximately 18 weeks per year traveling to countries of origin. The purpose of these travels is not to directly buy coffee. The goal is to continue to learn about coffee and to strengthen relationships with growers and suppliers. These relationships are critical to our future success - they solidify our role as champions of quality and progress at every level of the coffee business. It is because of these relationships that Starbucks gets the first pick of the best crops worldwide. To blend or not to blend Some of the most interesting tastes are a result of Coffee Blending. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We think learning about coffee is a never-ending journey At Starbucks we provide an expert level of coffee education to our partners as well as our customers. The Coffee department employs a team of Coffee Education Specialists who act as the eyes and ears of the coffee buyers for the rest of the company. We understand that developing a wide range of knowledge about coffee is a long process. Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists help train our field partners on an ongoing basis to keep them connected with the core of our business. Coffee Education Specialists have kept this interesting by: Holding traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremonies Conducting scientific aroma and sensory labs Facilitating tasting seminars Sponsoring coffee beverage contests Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists also help our business strategists stay connected with what partners and customers are saying. They play a pivotal role in keeping partners across all levels of the company inspired about our core product. This inspiration and enthusiasm is what ultimately creates a wonderful experience for our customers. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu boardcoffee education black apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Buy it online Black Apron Exclusives™ are also available online at StarbucksStore.com. We Want to Hear from You Tell us what you think about Black Apron Exclusives™ coffees. menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced So, you want to be a coffee expert? Join our experts for Coffee Conversations, a unique audio series exploring the world of coffee. Hosts Scott McMartin and Aileen Carrell take you to "Coffee College" and invite special guests to share their perspectives on topics such as entertaining with coffee, Fair Trade, coffee composting, home brewing and selecting the coffee beans that end up in your cup. Sit back, take a sip, and enjoy Coffee Conversations with Starbucks. Subscribe to RSS Feed Download | More Info Sommelier compares wine and coffee tasting C.A.F.E. Practices discussion with Conservation International Responses to Kona and flavored coffee questions Download | More Info A lesson in Coffee Speak An expert's take on entertaining with coffee Pairing coffee with food Download | More Info Coffee 101 A conversation with coffee farmers Meet Starbucks baristas Experience "coffee cupping" with a tasting expert Download Starbucks very first audio series dedicated to the exploration and appreciation of coffee, developed to help us celebrate our 35th anniversary. beverage lineuphear musiclocal eventsnutrition informationbrewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced 600 miles600 miles© 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ © 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ 2D3DRoadAerialHybridBird's eye See this location in bird's eye view Come to the coffeehouse Looking for a Starbucks? Our Store Locator will find one in your neighborhood or one along the way while you’re traveling. Looking for some fun? Live music. Book readings. Coffee seminars. There’s a lot going on inside at Starbucks. Find events happening near you. And invite a friend to meet. Magic in the air Find out more about what’s playing in our coffeehouses and check out our wireless locations. Find store Find route Find event Find Starbucks coffeehouses near Please enter a location. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon From Please enter a starting location. To Please enter a destination. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon Find events near Please enter a location. Between these dates & Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Event type All Events Art/Craft Book Reading/Book Club Charitable or Volunteer Event Coffee Seminar/Festival/Tasting Community Event Environment Film Holiday Job Fair Kids Music New Store Opening Other Sports/Fitness Walk Starbucks Sampling Hold down CTRL while clicking to select more than one event type. Find a Starbucks with your mobile phone Just type starbucks.com in your phone’s browser and access our Store Locator formatted for easy viewing. *Carrier charges may apply. buy a cardcustomize a cardreload a cardregister a cardduetto™ visa®corporate salessite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account A coffee break on a Card A Starbucks Card is the easiest way for you – or someone you know – to enjoy Starbucks. How can we help you today? Here's where you can register it, reload it and check your balance. Check your Card balance Card number Register your Starbucks Card more info Reload your Starbucks Card more info Reload someone else's Card more info Set up Auto-reload for yourself more info Set up Auto-reload for someone else more info Manage your Card account more info It's a thoughtful gift for someone (even if that someone is you). Buy a Card more info Customize a Card more info Corporate Sales more info Questions? Please see our list of Frequently Asked Questions. Please read our Terms and Conditions of Use. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. coffeeice creamstarbucks doubleshot®starbucks iced coffeefrappuccino® beveragestazo teasstarbucks™ liqueurssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The quality of Starbucks…the convenience of your grocery store Whether it's whole bean coffee, Frappuccino® coffee drink, or our delectable ice cream, you're sure to get Starbucks superior quality wherever you shop. Starbucks® Coffee Starbucks® House Blend, Sumatra, Caffè Verona®. Just three of the many varieties of Starbucks® coffees that are now available where you buy groceries. Starbucks® Ice Cream Love at first bite! Made from the finest ingredients, Starbucks® ice creams come in an array of flavors, and are a perfect treat any time. Frappuccino® Coffee Drink We took a great thing and made it even better. Now you can have a delicious, creamy Frappuccino® coffee drink any time, anywhere. It gets you going Start your day with a Starbucks DoubleShot®. Perfect for those of you who take your coffee to go. The delicious combination of Starbucks espresso and rich cream conveniently packaged for your busy lifestyle. Bring on the day! Questions or comments? Contact us Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. office coffee servicestarbucks card corporate salesfoodservicesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced A smart move. Bringing one of the world's most admired brands into your business is good for them and good for you! To offer Starbucks coffee in your break room, click here To offer Starbucks in your cafeteria, employee dining venue or catering program, click here To purchase Starbucks Cards for your employees or clients, click here The Gift of Starbucks Whether you’re thanking a faithful client or rewarding a job well done, the Starbucks Card is the perfect gift for every business occasion. Increasing the value Enhance your customers’ experience with the quality of Starbucks® coffee and Tazo® Tea. Hotels Colleges and Universities Business and Industry Cafeterias Healthcare Other Foodservice Venues Find out more Note: Not all programs are available outside of the continental United States. Get Starbucks coffee delivered to your office, no matter what size. Large or small, Starbucks Office Coffee has a solution for your office coffee and tea needs. Choose from a variety of Starbucks® coffees and Tazo® teas, in addition to other breakroom needs such as hot cocoa, Starbucks branded paper products and amenities. Find out more. A qualified high volume/high traffic retail or foodservice operation can own and operate a Starbucks licensed store. Examples include: hotels and resorts, healthcare, college and university campus environments and business and industry. Find out more. World Water Day Let's get the word out about clean, safe drinking water. Discover Now. Decaf Espresso Roast Smooth, balanced, with a sweet caramel finish. Discover Now. the companyinvestor relationscareer centerpress roomsocial responsibilityinternational storesrumor responsesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The bottom line We always figured that putting people before products just made good common sense. So far, it’s been working out for us. Our relationships with farmers yield the highest quality coffees. The connections we make in communities create a loyal following. And the support we provide our baristas pays off everyday. Read more about our unusually human approach to business in the 2006 Corporate Social Responsibility Annual Report. Thank you for your interest in Starbucks Coffee Company Find out more about us through: Our Mission Statement Investor Relations Our Corporate Social Responsibility department. Annual Meeting of Shareholders. The latest developments and up-to-date news at Starbucks Starbucks Espresso Training Delivers on the Promise of the Best Customer Experience Howard Schultz Transformation Agenda Communication #8 Love What You Do. Click here to see all our current job opportunities. Read it here Our Fiscal 2007 Year in Review. Now available online. 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menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.
menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Like many other fruits, coffee cherries grow on trees. Here are some interesting facts about coffee trees: Coffee trees are indigenous to Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula. They were transplanted to other parts of the world by Dutch merchants and other explorers. Some coffee trees have the potential to grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet. However, most are kept much shorter for ease of harvest. The average coffee tree bears enough cherries each season to produce between 1 and 1½ pounds of roasted coffee. The soil, climate, altitude, and surrounding plants that a coffee tree is exposed to during growth affect the flavor of the beans it produces. Arabica vs. Robusta Coffee Beans - There are two commercially important coffee species: coffea arabica and coffea canephora (robusta). Arabica coffee (about 75 percent of world production) grows best at high altitudes, has a much more refined flavor than other species, and contains about 1 percent caffeine by weight. As the name indicates, robusta coffee is a robust species, resistant to disease, with a high yield per plant. It flourishes at lower elevations and produces coffee with harsher flavor characteristics. Starbucks buys only the highest quality arabica coffees available, beans whose flavor develops fully through the Starbucks Roast®. Harvesting Coffee. Every year in November and December, coffee farmers all over the world are Harvesting Coffee. Beneath the canopy Coffee grown in the shade. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced At harvest time, coffee trees are laden with bright red coffee cherries. Ripe coffee cherries are cranberry. An unroasted coffee bean is simply the pit of the coffee cherry. The skin of the coffee cherry is very thick, with a slightly bitter flavor. The fruit beneath the skin, however, is intensely sweet. The texture of this layer of fruit is similar to a grape. Beneath the fruit is the parchment, covered with a thin, slippery, honey-like layer called "mucilage." The parchment of the coffee cherry serves as a protective pocket for the seed, much like the small pockets that protect the seeds of an apple. Removing the parchment, two translucent bluish green coffee beans are revealed, coated with a very thin layer called the "silverskin."While most coffee cherries contain two beans, 5 to 10 percent of the time, only one bean is produced in the cherry. This is called a "peaberry." Buying Coffee for Starbucks A highly selective process that is based on its performance in the cup, Buying Coffee for Starbucks is a unique job. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The perfect cup starts with the best beans Finding and purchasing the best green beans in the world is the first step that differentiates Starbucks® Coffee from the rest of the coffee industry. Starbucks is well-known for its exceptionally high quality coffees, care in selection, and expertise in roast. Each coffee is selected for the defining qualities that distinguish its origin. This careful selection process illustrates Starbucks passion for buying and roasting the world's best coffee. Coffee is a huge business. In fact, coffee is the second most valuable commodity after oil. We comb the world for the perfect combination of climate, soil, elevation, and agricultural practices that come together to produce a great coffee. When searching for coffees, the only question for Starbucks is this: Which coffees from a given location best represent the perfect intersection of climate and skilled horticulture? It is a search for unmistakable regional flavors, what a French wine-maker would call goût de terroir, the taste of the place. At Starbucks, coffee is a fresh produce, not a commodity. When the inevitable happens and a given coffee estate or region has an "off" year, we simply don't offer that coffee. We make this tough decision rather than offering a lower quality selection to our valued customers. We buy coffee solely on its performance in the cup. The coffee we buy is truly special, spectacular coffee. The coffee buying team evaluates over one thousand "offer samples" each year. The evaluation process includes roasting small batches of coffee and tasting these batches in a process called "cupping." Only a very few of these sampled coffees make it into our warehouses. Starbucks coffee buyers spend approximately 18 weeks per year traveling to countries of origin. The purpose of these travels is not to directly buy coffee. The goal is to continue to learn about coffee and to strengthen relationships with growers and suppliers. These relationships are critical to our future success - they solidify our role as champions of quality and progress at every level of the coffee business. It is because of these relationships that Starbucks gets the first pick of the best crops worldwide. To blend or not to blend Some of the most interesting tastes are a result of Coffee Blending. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We think learning about coffee is a never-ending journey At Starbucks we provide an expert level of coffee education to our partners as well as our customers. The Coffee department employs a team of Coffee Education Specialists who act as the eyes and ears of the coffee buyers for the rest of the company. We understand that developing a wide range of knowledge about coffee is a long process. Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists help train our field partners on an ongoing basis to keep them connected with the core of our business. Coffee Education Specialists have kept this interesting by: Holding traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremonies Conducting scientific aroma and sensory labs Facilitating tasting seminars Sponsoring coffee beverage contests Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists also help our business strategists stay connected with what partners and customers are saying. They play a pivotal role in keeping partners across all levels of the company inspired about our core product. This inspiration and enthusiasm is what ultimately creates a wonderful experience for our customers. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu boardcoffee education black apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Buy it online Black Apron Exclusives™ are also available online at StarbucksStore.com. We Want to Hear from You Tell us what you think about Black Apron Exclusives™ coffees. menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced So, you want to be a coffee expert? Join our experts for Coffee Conversations, a unique audio series exploring the world of coffee. Hosts Scott McMartin and Aileen Carrell take you to "Coffee College" and invite special guests to share their perspectives on topics such as entertaining with coffee, Fair Trade, coffee composting, home brewing and selecting the coffee beans that end up in your cup. Sit back, take a sip, and enjoy Coffee Conversations with Starbucks. Subscribe to RSS Feed Download | More Info Sommelier compares wine and coffee tasting C.A.F.E. Practices discussion with Conservation International Responses to Kona and flavored coffee questions Download | More Info A lesson in Coffee Speak An expert's take on entertaining with coffee Pairing coffee with food Download | More Info Coffee 101 A conversation with coffee farmers Meet Starbucks baristas Experience "coffee cupping" with a tasting expert Download Starbucks very first audio series dedicated to the exploration and appreciation of coffee, developed to help us celebrate our 35th anniversary. beverage lineuphear musiclocal eventsnutrition informationbrewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced 600 miles600 miles© 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ © 2007 Microsoft Corporation © 2007 NAVTEQ 2D3DRoadAerialHybridBird's eye See this location in bird's eye view Come to the coffeehouse Looking for a Starbucks? Our Store Locator will find one in your neighborhood or one along the way while you’re traveling. Looking for some fun? Live music. Book readings. Coffee seminars. There’s a lot going on inside at Starbucks. Find events happening near you. And invite a friend to meet. Magic in the air Find out more about what’s playing in our coffeehouses and check out our wireless locations. Find store Find route Find event Find Starbucks coffeehouses near Please enter a location. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon From Please enter a starting location. To Please enter a destination. Limit search to coffeehouses with Wireless Hotspot Available Drive Through Window Oven-Warmed Food iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store Airport Stores Coming Soon Find events near Please enter a location. Between these dates & Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Please enter a valid date: MM/DD/YYYY Event type All Events Art/Craft Book Reading/Book Club Charitable or Volunteer Event Coffee Seminar/Festival/Tasting Community Event Environment Film Holiday Job Fair Kids Music New Store Opening Other Sports/Fitness Walk Starbucks Sampling Hold down CTRL while clicking to select more than one event type. Find a Starbucks with your mobile phone Just type starbucks.com in your phone’s browser and access our Store Locator formatted for easy viewing. *Carrier charges may apply. buy a cardcustomize a cardreload a cardregister a cardduetto™ visa®corporate salessite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account A coffee break on a Card A Starbucks Card is the easiest way for you – or someone you know – to enjoy Starbucks. How can we help you today? Here's where you can register it, reload it and check your balance. 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Choose from a variety of Starbucks® coffees and Tazo® teas, in addition to other breakroom needs such as hot cocoa, Starbucks branded paper products and amenities. Find out more. A qualified high volume/high traffic retail or foodservice operation can own and operate a Starbucks licensed store. Examples include: hotels and resorts, healthcare, college and university campus environments and business and industry. Find out more. World Water Day Let's get the word out about clean, safe drinking water. Discover Now. Decaf Espresso Roast Smooth, balanced, with a sweet caramel finish. Discover Now. the companyinvestor relationscareer centerpress roomsocial responsibilityinternational storesrumor responsesite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The bottom line We always figured that putting people before products just made good common sense. So far, it’s been working out for us. 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Starbucks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. Starbucks Corporation Type Public (NASDAQ: SBUX,SEHK: 4337) Founded In 1971 across from Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington Headquarters Seattle, Washington, USA Key people Howard Schultz, Chairman, President and CEO Martin Coles, Chief Operating Officer James C. Alling, President, Starbucks International Peter Bocian, Chief Financial Officer Industry Restaurants Retail Coffee and Tea Retail Beverages Entertainment Products Whole Bean Coffee Boxed Tea Made-to-order beverages Bottled beverages Baked Goods Merchandise Frappuccino beverages Revenue ? US$7.786 billion (2006) Employees 147,436 Subsidiaries Starbucks Coffee Company Tazo Tea Company Seattle's Best Coffee Torrefazione Italia Hear Music Ethos Water Website Starbucks.com Starbucks Corporation (NASDAQ: SBUX [3]; SEHK: 4337) is a multinational coffee and coffeehouse chain company based in the United States. Starbucks is the largest coffeehouse company in the world,[1] with 15,011 stores in 42 countries.[2] Starbucks sells drip brewed coffee, espresso-based hot drinks, other hot and cold drinks, snacks and items such as mugs and coffee beans. Through the Starbucks Entertainment division and Hear Music brand, the company also markets books, music, and film. Many of these products are seasonal or specific to the locality of the store. Starbucks brand ice cream and coffee are also sold at grocery stores. From Starbucks's founding in Seattle, Washington, as a local coffee bean roaster and retailer, Starbucks has expanded rapidly. In the 1990s, the company was opening a new store every workday, a pace that continued into the 2000s. Domestic growth has since slowed down, though the company continues to expand in foreign markets and is opening 7 stores a day worldwide. The first location outside of the U.S. and Canada was established in 1996, and they now constitute almost one third of Starbucks' stores.[3] As of November 2007, Starbucks had 8,505 company-owned outlets worldwide: 6,793 of them in the United States and 1,712 in other countries and U.S. territories. In addition, the company has 6,506 joint-venture and licensed outlets, 3,891 of them in the United States and 2,615 in other countries and U.S. territories. This brings the total locations (as of November 2007) to 15,011 worldwide.[2] Starbucks can be found in many popular grocery chains in the U.S. and Canada, as well as in many airports. Starbucks' corporate headquarters are in Seattle, Washington, United States. As of January 2008, the members of the company's board of directors are Howard Schultz (Chair), Barbara Bass, Howard Behar, Bill Bradley, Mellody Hobson, Olden Lee, James Shennan, Jr., Javier Teruel, Myron Ullman, III, and Craig Weatherup. Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Products 2.1 Staffing 2.2 "The Third Place" 2.3 International operations 3 Intellectual property 3.1 Name 3.2 Logo 3.3 Parodies and infringements 4 Criticism and controversy 4.1 Cultural imperialism 4.2 Anti-competitive tactics 4.3 Labor disputes 4.4 Coffee bean market 4.5 Ethos water controversy 4.6 Recycled paper cups 5 Other ventures 5.1 Starbucks and Apple 6 See also 7 References 8 External links [edit] History The original Starbucks was opened in Seattle, Washington, in 1971 by three partners: English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegel, and writer Gordon Bowker. The three were inspired by Alfred Peet, whom they knew personally, to open their first store in Pike Place Market to sell high-quality coffee beans and equipment. The original Starbucks location was at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971-1976. That store then moved to 1912 Pike Place; it is still open. During their first year of operation, they purchased green coffee beans from Peet's, then began buying directly from growers. A Starbucks coffee shop in Leeds, United KingdomEntrepreneur Howard Schultz joined the company in 1982, and, after a trip to Milan, advised that the company sell coffee and espresso drinks as well as beans. The owners rejected this idea, believing that getting into the beverage business would distract the company from its primary focus. To them, coffee was something to be prepared in the home. Certain that there was much money to be made selling drinks to on-the-go Americans, Schultz started the Il Giornale coffee bar chain in 1985. In 1984, the original owners of Starbucks, led by Baldwin, took the opportunity to purchase Peet's (Baldwin still works there today). In 1987, they sold the Starbucks chain to Schultz's Il Giornale, which rebranded the Il Giornale outlets as Starbucks and quickly began to expand. Starbucks opened its first locations outside Seattle at Waterfront Station in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (which now has more locations than anywhere in the world)[citation needed] and Chicago, Illinois, United States that same year. At the time of its initial public offering on the stock market in 1992, Starbucks had grown to 165 outlets. Starbucks Headquarters, Seattle.The first Starbucks location outside of North America opened in Tokyo in 1996. Starbucks entered the U.K. market in 1998 with the acquisition of the then 60-outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company, re-branding all its stores as Starbucks. By November 2005, London had more outlets than Manhattan,[4] a sign of Starbucks becoming an international brand. In April 2003, Starbucks completed the purchase of Seattle's Best Coffee and Torrefazione Italia from AFC Enterprises, bringing the total number of Starbucks-operated locations worldwide to more than 6,400. On September 14, 2006, rival Diedrich Coffee announced that it would sell most of its company-owned retail stores to Starbucks. This sale includes the company owned locations of the Oregon-based Coffee People chain. Starbucks representatives have been quoted as saying they will convert the Diedrich Coffee and Coffee People locations to Starbucks stores.[5][6] Starbucks' chairman, Howard Schultz, has talked about the tension that exists in the company between their rapid expansion (they aim to eventually operate 40,000 retail stores worldwide)[7] and their collective desire to act like a small company. In January 2008, Chairman Howard Schultz resumed his role as Chief Executive Officer, replacing Jim Donald, who had succeeded Schultz in 2000. Schultz's principal challenge is to restore what he calls the "distinctive Starbucks experience" in the face of rapid expansion. Analysts believe that Schultz must determine how to contend with higher materials prices and enhanced competition from lower-price competitors, including McDonald's and Dunkin' Donuts. [8] On January 31, 2008, Schultz announced that Starbucks would discontinue its warm food products, originally scheduled to launch nationwide in 2008, in order to refocus the brand on coffee. Also in January 2008, with Dunkin' Donuts and McDonalds quickly becoming stiff competition in the specialty coffee market, Starbucks started testing selling an 8 oz "short" brewed coffee for $1 and giving free refills on all brewed coffee. So far this test is limited to the greater Seattle market, with no plans for expansion to national markets as of yet. The normal price for a short brewed coffee at Starbucks is about $1.50, when Dunkin' Donuts 10 ounce coffee runs for $1.39 and McDonalds' 12 ounce premium coffee is $1.07. [9] [edit] Products A Starbucks Venti Java Chip FrappuccinoStarbucks serves a variety of beverages including brewed coffee, hot chocolate, espresso, teas, and Frappuccino. Also available are bottled beverages including Naked Juice, Ethos water, San Pellegrino, Izze soda, and Horizon Organic Milk. Cappuccinos, and all other beverages with steamed-milk and/or foam can be customized to order with pumps of flavored syrups, reasonable temperature changes and additional espresso shots. Starbucks also offers blended beverages, such as the "Frappuccino Blended Coffee", a flavored drink of coffee, milk, and sugar blended with ice. The name is a portmanteau of frappé and cappuccino and was introduced in 1995. Starbucks markets seasonal beverages as well, such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte (Thanksgiving) Gingerbread Latte, Peppermint Mocha, Eggnog Latte (Christmas) and Leprechaun Latte (St. Patrick's Day). There is also seasonal brewed coffee, like the "Christmas Blend" of whole bean coffee. Starbucks supplements the beverage offerings with pastries, salads, cold sandwiches, coffee merchandise and at-home brewing equipment, and pre-packed or scooped coffee beans. Starbucks also has a variety of kosher products, but due to business hours and sandwich products a Starbucks retail store cannot be certified 'kosher' according to Jewish law.[10] Starbucks does not franchise with individuals within North America but does enter into licensing arrangements with some companies.[11] One example is of Starbucks store locations in airports, most of which are operated by HMSHost, owned by the Italian Autogrill group. Other licensed locations include grocery stores, major food services corporations, college and university campuses, and hospitals. In addition, Starbucks has partnered with Magic Johnson's Johnson Development Corporation to form Urban Coffee Opportunities, which opens retail locations in low-income urban areas.[12] [edit] Staffing There are usually from two to six partners (as Starbucks employees are called), all of them trained baristas, in each retail store at any one time. Black aprons labeled "Coffee Master" are worn by employees who have completed the Coffee Master course, which educates employees in not only the tasting, but also growing regions, roasting and purchasing (including fair trade practices) aspects of the coffee industry. In the United States and Canada Starbucks offers full benefits such as health, dental, and vision insurance, as well as stock-option grants and 401k with matching to employees who work an average of at least 20 hours per week. Each employee can receive a box of tea or a pound of coffee each week if they choose. As of 2008, Starbucks was ranked by Fortune magazine as the 7th best company to work for in the United States, up from 16th in 2007. In 2006 and 2005 it was ranked 29th and 11th, respectively.[13] Starbucks was also voted as one of the top ten UK workplaces by the Financial Times in 2007. [edit] "The Third Place" Starbucks in Frankfurt am Main, GermanyStarbucks envisions local outlets as a "third place" (besides home and work) to spend time, and store design is intended to achieve this. The café section of the store is often outfitted with stuffed chairs and tables with hard-backed chairs. Most stores provide free electricity for customers, and many stores also provide wireless internet access (provided in American stores by T-Mobile[14] and in Canadian stores by Bell Mobility[15]) The company is noted for its non-smoking policy at almost all of its outlets, despite predictions that this would never succeed in markets such as Germany, which used to have few restrictions on smoking. This has changed in 2007 with many German states issuing smoking bans for restaurants and bars. Outlets in Vienna and Mexico City, which have smoking rooms separated by double doors from the coffee shop itself, and a smoking room upstairs in the Largo do Senado, Macau, branch are the closest the company has come to making exceptions. According to the company, the smoking ban is to ensure that the coffee aroma is not adulterated. The company also asks its employees to refrain from wearing strong perfumes for similar reasons.[16] Starbucks generally does not prohibit smoking in outside seating areas, unless required by local codes. [edit] International operations Countries that contain Starbucks stores A typical sales area, this one in Peterborough, UK, showing a display of food and the beverage preparation area Starbucks inside Tsutaya in Shibuya, JapanStores are now found in Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia[17], Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. New stores will be opened in Argentina[18], Bulgaria[19] , Colombia[20], Hungary[21], India, Iraq, Morocco, Poland[22], Portugal[23], Serbia and South Africa. [edit] Intellectual property Starbucks U.S. Brands, LLC, is a Starbucks-owned company that currently holds and owns the property rights to approximately 120 Starbucks Coffee Company patents and trademarks. It is located at 2525 Starbucks Way in Minden, Nevada.[24] [edit] Name The company is named in part after Starbuck, Captain Ahab's first mate in the book Moby-Dick, as well as a turn-of-the-century mining camp (Starbo or Storbo) on Mount Rainier. According to Howard Schultz's book Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time, the name of the company was derived from Moby-Dick, although not in as direct a fashion as many assume. Gordon Bowker liked the name "Pequod" (the ship in the novel), but his creative partner Terry Heckler responded, "No one's going to drink a cup of Pee-quod!" Heckler suggested "Starbo." Brainstorming with these two ideas resulted in the company being named for the Pequod's first mate, Starbuck.[25] International names include: Arabic-speaking countries: ??????? (transliteration: starbaks) China, Hong Kong, Taiwan: ??? Pinyin: xingbakè (? xing means "star", while ?ba ?kè is a transliteration of "-bucks") Israel: ??????? (transliteration: s?arbaqs) Japan: ??????? (transliteration: sutabakkusu, phonological: staa-bahkss) South Korea: ???? (transliteration: seutabeokseu), often used in conjunction with the English name Quebec, Canada: Café Starbucks Coffee[26] (added the French word to avoid controversy with local language politics) Thailand: ?????????? pronounced [sota?bak?o] [edit] Logo The logo is a "twin-tailed siren" (the siren of Greek mythology).[27] The logo has been significantly streamlined over the years. In the first version, which gave the impression of an authentic 18th century European woodcut, the Starbucks siren was topless and had a fully-visible double fish tail. The image also had a rough visual texture. In the second version, her chest was covered by her flowing hair, but her navel was still visible, and the fish tail was cropped slightly. In the current version, her navel and chest are not visible at all, and only vestiges remain of the fish tails. The original "woodcut" logo can still be seen on the Starbucks store in Seattle's Pike Place Market, and on certain coffee bags. At the beginning of September 2006, Starbucks temporarily reintroduced its original brown logo on paper hot drink cups. Starbucks has stated that this was done to show the company's heritage from the Pacific Northwest and to celebrate 35 years of business. The vintage logo has sparked some controversy due to the siren's bare chest. Recently, an elementary school principal in Kent, Washington, was reported as asking teachers to "cover up" the mermaid of the retro cups with a cup sleeve of some kind.[27] [edit] Parodies and infringements In 2000, San Francisco cartoonist Kieron Dwyer was sued by Starbucks for copyright and trademark infringement after creating a parody of its siren logo and putting it on coffee mugs, t-shirts, and stickers that he sold on his website and at comic book conventions. Dwyer felt that since his work was a parody it was protected by his right to free speech under U.S. law. The judge agreed that Dwyer's work was a parody and thus enjoyed constitutional protection; however, he was forbidden from financially "profiting" from using a "confusingly similar" image of the Starbucks siren logo. Dwyer is currently allowed to display the image as an expression of free speech, but he can no longer sell it.[28] In 2003, Starbucks successfully sued a Shanghai competitor in China for trademark infringement, because that chain used a green-and-white logo with a similar sounding Chinese name.[29] Also in 2003, Starbucks sent a cease-and-desist letter to "HaidaBucks Coffee House" in Masset, British Columbia, Canada. The store was owned by a group of young Haida men, commonly referred to as "bucks." After facing criticism, Starbucks dropped its demand after HaidaBucks dropped "coffee house" from its name.[30] In 2005 Starbucks lost a trademark infringement case against a smaller coffee vendor in South Korea that operates coffee stations under the name and style Starpreya. The company, Elpreya, says Starpreya is named after the Norse goddess, Freja, with the letters of that name changed to ease pronunciation by Koreans. The court rejected the Seattle-based retailer's claim that the logo of Starpreya is too similar to the famous Starbucks logo.[31] [edit] Criticism and controversy Starbucks has come to be regarded by some, particularly in the global justice movement, as symbolic of the problems posed by globalization. Several activist groups maintain websites criticizing the company's fair-trade policies, labor relations, and environmental impact, and hold it as a prime example of U.S. cultural and economic imperialism. Several Starbucks locations were vandalized during the WTO meeting held in Seattle in late 1999. Although no organization claimed responsibility for the vandalism, the anarchist circle-A symbol was spray-painted on several stores.[32] [edit] Cultural imperialism Starbucks at the Forbidden City in Beijing (closed since July 2007)The Starbucks location in the former imperial palace in Beijing closed in July 2007. The coffee shop had been a source of ongoing controversy since its opening in 2000 with protesters objecting that the presence of the American chain in this location "was trampling on Chinese culture".[33][34][35][36] [edit] Anti-competitive tactics Some of the methods Starbucks has used to expand and maintain their dominant market position, such as buying out competitors' leases, acquiring independent coffee shops and converting them into Starbucks stores, and clustering several locations in a small geographical area (i.e., saturating the market), have been labeled anti-competitive by critics.[37] For example, Starbucks fueled its initial expansion into the UK market with a buyout of its only major potential competitor (the 49 outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company), then used its capital and influence to obtain prime locations, some of which operated at a financial loss. Critics claimed this was an unfair attempt to drive out small, independent competitors, who could not afford to pay inflated prices for premium real estate.[38] [edit] Labor disputes Since 2004, workers at seven Starbucks stores in New York City have joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) as the Starbucks Workers Union.[39] According to a Starbucks Union press release, since then, the union membership has begun expanding to Chicago and Maryland.[40] On March 7, 2006, the IWW and Starbucks agreed to a National Labor Relations Board settlement in which three Starbucks workers were granted almost US$2,000 in back wages and two fired employees were offered reinstatement.[41][42][43] According to the Starbucks Union, on November 24, 2006, IWW members picketed Starbucks locations in more than 50 cities around the world in countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain and New Zealand, as well as U.S. cities including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco,[44] to protest the firing of five Starbucks Workers Union organizers by Starbucks and to demand their reinstatement. Some Starbucks baristas in Canada,[45] Australia and New Zealand,[46] and the United States[47] belong to a variety of unions. In 2005, Starbucks paid out US$165,000 to eight employees at its Kent, Washington, roasting plant to settle charges that they had been retaliated against for being pro-union. At the time, the plant workers were represented by the IUOE. Starbucks admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement.[39] A Starbucks strike occurred in Auckland, New Zealand, on November 23, 2005.[46] Organized by Unite Union, workers sought secure hours, a minimum wage of NZ$12 an hour, and the abolition of youth rates. The company settled with the Union in 2006, resulting in pay increases, increased security of hours, and an improvement in youth rates.[48] According to Starbucks Chairman Howard Schulz, "If they had faith in me and my motives, they wouldn't need a union." According to The Seattle Times, "The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 286 had trouble with Starbucks at its Kent roasting plant, where the union no longer represents workers".[39] [edit] Coffee bean market In 2000, the company introduced a line of fair trade products.[49] Of the approximately 136,000 tonnes (300 million pounds) of coffee Starbucks purchased in 2006, about 6 percent was certified as fair trade.[50] According to Starbucks, they purchased 2,180 tonnes (4.8 million pounds) of Certified Fair Trade coffee in fiscal year 2004 and 5,220 tonnes (11.5 million pounds) in 2005. They have become the largest buyer of Certified Fair Trade coffee in North America (10% of the global market). Transfair USA,[51] the only third-party certifier of Fair Trade Certified coffee in the United States, has noted the impact Starbucks has made in the area of Fair Trade and coffee farmer's lives by saying: Since launching {its} FTC coffee line in 2000, Starbucks has undeniably made a significant contribution to family farmers through their rapidly growing FTC coffee volume. By offering FTC coffee in thousands of stores, Starbucks has also given the FTC label greater visibility, helping to raise consumer awareness in the process. Groups such as Global Exchange are calling for Starbucks to further increase its sales of fair trade coffees. However, fair trade certification can cost US$20,000 to US$30,000[citation needed], and many growers are unwilling or unable to pay for certification[citation needed]. [edit] Ethos water controversy Ethos, a brand of bottled water acquired by Starbucks in 2005, is sold at locations throughout North America. Ethos bottles feature prominent labeling stating "helping children get clean water", referring to the fact that $.05 from each $1.80USD bottle sold ($.10 per unit in Canada) is used to fund clean water projects in under-developed areas. Critics have argued that the claim on the label misleads consumers into thinking that Ethos is primarily a charitable organization, when it is actually a for-profit Starbucks brand and the vast majority of the sale price (over 94%) does not support clean-water projects.[52] Although sales of Ethos water has raised over $4,000,000 for clean water efforts, the brand is not a charity and has added to Starbucks revenue.[53] The founders of Ethos have stated that the brand is intended to raise awareness of third-world clean water issues and provide socially responsible consumers with an opportunity to support the cause by choosing Ethos over other brands.[54] Starbucks has since redesigned the American version of the Ethos water bottles, stating the amount of money donated per bottle in the description. [edit] Recycled paper cups In 2006, Starbucks introduced cups made with 10 percent recycled material. With 1.5 billion cups used annually in the United States at that time, the change was estimated to save approximately five million pounds of virgin tree fiber a year. Prior to the announcement, Starbucks used recycled paper into its cardboard cup sleeves, napkins, and cardboard carriers. A major obstacle for the recycled paper cup was that recycled content had never before been used in direct contact with food, especially not with steaming hot beverages. Although permission was not required, Starbucks and its pulp manufacturer, the Mississippi River Corporation, decided to seek Food and Drug Administration approval for the new cups. Had Starbucks not bothered to get F.D.A. approval, the cup development process would have taken only three months instead of more than two years. Starbucks said it was the first time that a national food chain had incorporated recycled material into packaging that comes into direct contact with food or beverages, but critics claim that the company should be doing much more to protect the environment.[55][56] [edit] Other ventures Main article: Hear Music Starbucks entered the music industry in 1999 with the acquisition of Hear Music, and the film industry in 2006 with the creation of Starbucks Entertainment. Starbucks Entertainment was one of the producers of the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee. Retail stores heavily advertised the film before its release. Hear Music is the brand name of Starbucks' retail music concept. Hear Music began as a catalog company in 1990 and was purchased by Starbucks in 1999. Nearly three years later, in 2002, they produced a Starbucks opera album, featuring artists such as Luciano Pavarotti. [edit] Starbucks and Apple Starbucks has entered into a partnership with Apple to collaborate on selling music as part of the coffeehouse experience. In October of 2006, Apple added a Starbucks Entertainment area to the iTunes Music Store, selling similar music that appeared in Starbucks stores. In September of 2007 Apple announced that there would be wireless communication between Apple and Starbucks. Through the T-Mobile Wi-Fi, a paywall is opened up to allow any individual connecting to T-Mobile Hotspot access to the iTunes Music Store (regardless of whether he or she is a T-Mobile Hotspot subscriber). The partnership is primarily targeted at iPhone, iPod Touch, and Macbook users (although anyone with access to iTunes can take advantage of it). In addition, the iTunes Music Store will automatically detect the current and last 10 songs playing in a Starbucks and offer users connected to the store's wireless network the opportunity to download the tracks. This feature has been rolled out in Seattle, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area, and will slowly be offered in limited markets during 2007-2008.[57] During the fall of 2007 Starbucks also began to sell digital downloads of certain albums through iTunes. The buyer would buy the download at Starbucks, and enter the code on the download card at the iTunes Music Store, and then the entire album would immediately start downloading. From October 2 to November 7, 2007, Starbucks gave away 37 different songs for free download through iTunes as part of the "Song of the Day" promotion. Each day, baristas would give out download cards for a particular song which could be redeemed on [edit] See also List of coffeehouse chains
menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.
menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.
menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Like many other fruits, coffee cherries grow on trees. Here are some interesting facts about coffee trees: Coffee trees are indigenous to Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula. They were transplanted to other parts of the world by Dutch merchants and other explorers. Some coffee trees have the potential to grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet. However, most are kept much shorter for ease of harvest. The average coffee tree bears enough cherries each season to produce between 1 and 1½ pounds of roasted coffee. The soil, climate, altitude, and surrounding plants that a coffee tree is exposed to during growth affect the flavor of the beans it produces. Arabica vs. Robusta Coffee Beans - There are two commercially important coffee species: coffea arabica and coffea canephora (robusta). Arabica coffee (about 75 percent of world production) grows best at high altitudes, has a much more refined flavor than other species, and contains about 1 percent caffeine by weight. As the name indicates, robusta coffee is a robust species, resistant to disease, with a high yield per plant. It flourishes at lower elevations and produces coffee with harsher flavor characteristics. Starbucks buys only the highest quality arabica coffees available, beans whose flavor develops fully through the Starbucks Roast®. Harvesting Coffee. Every year in November and December, coffee farmers all over the world are Harvesting Coffee. Beneath the canopy Coffee grown in the shade. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced At harvest time, coffee trees are laden with bright red coffee cherries. Ripe coffee cherries are cranberry. An unroasted coffee bean is simply the pit of the coffee cherry. The skin of the coffee cherry is very thick, with a slightly bitter flavor. The fruit beneath the skin, however, is intensely sweet. The texture of this layer of fruit is similar to a grape. Beneath the fruit is the parchment, covered with a thin, slippery, honey-like layer called "mucilage." The parchment of the coffee cherry serves as a protective pocket for the seed, much like the small pockets that protect the seeds of an apple. Removing the parchment, two translucent bluish green coffee beans are revealed, coated with a very thin layer called the "silverskin."While most coffee cherries contain two beans, 5 to 10 percent of the time, only one bean is produced in the cherry. This is called a "peaberry." Buying Coffee for Starbucks A highly selective process that is based on its performance in the cup, Buying Coffee for Starbucks is a unique job. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The perfect cup starts with the best beans Finding and purchasing the best green beans in the world is the first step that differentiates Starbucks® Coffee from the rest of the coffee industry. Starbucks is well-known for its exceptionally high quality coffees, care in selection, and expertise in roast. Each coffee is selected for the defining qualities that distinguish its origin. This careful selection process illustrates Starbucks passion for buying and roasting the world's best coffee. Coffee is a huge business. In fact, coffee is the second most valuable commodity after oil. We comb the world for the perfect combination of climate, soil, elevation, and agricultural practices that come together to produce a great coffee. When searching for coffees, the only question for Starbucks is this: Which coffees from a given location best represent the perfect intersection of climate and skilled horticulture? It is a search for unmistakable regional flavors, what a French wine-maker would call goût de terroir, the taste of the place. At Starbucks, coffee is a fresh produce, not a commodity. When the inevitable happens and a given coffee estate or region has an "off" year, we simply don't offer that coffee. We make this tough decision rather than offering a lower quality selection to our valued customers. We buy coffee solely on its performance in the cup. The coffee we buy is truly special, spectacular coffee. The coffee buying team evaluates over one thousand "offer samples" each year. The evaluation process includes roasting small batches of coffee and tasting these batches in a process called "cupping." Only a very few of these sampled coffees make it into our warehouses. Starbucks coffee buyers spend approximately 18 weeks per year traveling to countries of origin. The purpose of these travels is not to directly buy coffee. The goal is to continue to learn about coffee and to strengthen relationships with growers and suppliers. These relationships are critical to our future success - they solidify our role as champions of quality and progress at every level of the coffee business. It is because of these relationships that Starbucks gets the first pick of the best crops worldwide. To blend or not to blend Some of the most interesting tastes are a result of Coffee Blending. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We think learning about coffee is a never-ending journey At Starbucks we provide an expert level of coffee education to our partners as well as our customers. The Coffee department employs a team of Coffee Education Specialists who act as the eyes and ears of the coffee buyers for the rest of the company. We understand that developing a wide range of knowledge about coffee is a long process. Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists help train our field partners on an ongoing basis to keep them connected with the core of our business. Coffee Education Specialists have kept this interesting by: Holding traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremonies Conducting scientific aroma and sensory labs Facilitating tasting seminars Sponsoring coffee beverage contests Starbucks Coffee Education Specialists also help our business strategists stay connected with what partners and customers are saying. They play a pivotal role in keeping partners across all levels of the company inspired about our core product. This inspiration and enthusiasm is what ultimately creates a wonderful experience for our customers. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. menu boardcoffee education black apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Buy it online Black Apron Exclusives™ are also available online at StarbucksStore.com. We Want to Hear from You Tell us what you think about Black Apron Exclusives™ coffees. menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusives coffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced So, you want to be a coffee expert? Join our experts for Coffee Conversations, a unique audio series exploring the world of coffee. Hosts Scott McMartin and Aileen Carrell take you to "Coffee College" and invite special guests to share their perspectives on topics such as entertaining with coffee, Fair Trade, coffee composting, home brewing and selecting the coffee beans that end up in your cup. Sit back, take a sip, and enjoy Coffee Conversations with Starbucks. Subscribe to RSS Feed Download | More Info Sommelier compares wine and coffee tasting C.A.F.E. 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Starbucks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. Starbucks Corporation Type Public (NASDAQ: SBUX,SEHK: 4337) Founded In 1971 across from Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington Headquarters Seattle, Washington, USA Key people Howard Schultz, Chairman, President and CEO Martin Coles, Chief Operating Officer James C. Alling, President, Starbucks International Peter Bocian, Chief Financial Officer Industry Restaurants Retail Coffee and Tea Retail Beverages Entertainment Products Whole Bean Coffee Boxed Tea Made-to-order beverages Bottled beverages Baked Goods Merchandise Frappuccino beverages Revenue ? US$7.786 billion (2006) Employees 147,436 Subsidiaries Starbucks Coffee Company Tazo Tea Company Seattle's Best Coffee Torrefazione Italia Hear Music Ethos Water Website Starbucks.com Starbucks Corporation (NASDAQ: SBUX [3]; SEHK: 4337) is a multinational coffee and coffeehouse chain company based in the United States. Starbucks is the largest coffeehouse company in the world,[1] with 15,011 stores in 42 countries.[2] Starbucks sells drip brewed coffee, espresso-based hot drinks, other hot and cold drinks, snacks and items such as mugs and coffee beans. Through the Starbucks Entertainment division and Hear Music brand, the company also markets books, music, and film. Many of these products are seasonal or specific to the locality of the store. Starbucks brand ice cream and coffee are also sold at grocery stores. From Starbucks's founding in Seattle, Washington, as a local coffee bean roaster and retailer, Starbucks has expanded rapidly. In the 1990s, the company was opening a new store every workday, a pace that continued into the 2000s. Domestic growth has since slowed down, though the company continues to expand in foreign markets and is opening 7 stores a day worldwide. The first location outside of the U.S. and Canada was established in 1996, and they now constitute almost one third of Starbucks' stores.[3] As of November 2007, Starbucks had 8,505 company-owned outlets worldwide: 6,793 of them in the United States and 1,712 in other countries and U.S. territories. In addition, the company has 6,506 joint-venture and licensed outlets, 3,891 of them in the United States and 2,615 in other countries and U.S. territories. This brings the total locations (as of November 2007) to 15,011 worldwide.[2] Starbucks can be found in many popular grocery chains in the U.S. and Canada, as well as in many airports. Starbucks' corporate headquarters are in Seattle, Washington, United States. As of January 2008, the members of the company's board of directors are Howard Schultz (Chair), Barbara Bass, Howard Behar, Bill Bradley, Mellody Hobson, Olden Lee, James Shennan, Jr., Javier Teruel, Myron Ullman, III, and Craig Weatherup. Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Products 2.1 Staffing 2.2 "The Third Place" 2.3 International operations 3 Intellectual property 3.1 Name 3.2 Logo 3.3 Parodies and infringements 4 Criticism and controversy 4.1 Cultural imperialism 4.2 Anti-competitive tactics 4.3 Labor disputes 4.4 Coffee bean market 4.5 Ethos water controversy 4.6 Recycled paper cups 5 Other ventures 5.1 Starbucks and Apple 6 See also 7 References 8 External links [edit] History The original Starbucks was opened in Seattle, Washington, in 1971 by three partners: English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegel, and writer Gordon Bowker. The three were inspired by Alfred Peet, whom they knew personally, to open their first store in Pike Place Market to sell high-quality coffee beans and equipment. The original Starbucks location was at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971-1976. That store then moved to 1912 Pike Place; it is still open. During their first year of operation, they purchased green coffee beans from Peet's, then began buying directly from growers. A Starbucks coffee shop in Leeds, United KingdomEntrepreneur Howard Schultz joined the company in 1982, and, after a trip to Milan, advised that the company sell coffee and espresso drinks as well as beans. The owners rejected this idea, believing that getting into the beverage business would distract the company from its primary focus. To them, coffee was something to be prepared in the home. Certain that there was much money to be made selling drinks to on-the-go Americans, Schultz started the Il Giornale coffee bar chain in 1985. In 1984, the original owners of Starbucks, led by Baldwin, took the opportunity to purchase Peet's (Baldwin still works there today). In 1987, they sold the Starbucks chain to Schultz's Il Giornale, which rebranded the Il Giornale outlets as Starbucks and quickly began to expand. Starbucks opened its first locations outside Seattle at Waterfront Station in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (which now has more locations than anywhere in the world)[citation needed] and Chicago, Illinois, United States that same year. At the time of its initial public offering on the stock market in 1992, Starbucks had grown to 165 outlets. Starbucks Headquarters, Seattle.The first Starbucks location outside of North America opened in Tokyo in 1996. Starbucks entered the U.K. market in 1998 with the acquisition of the then 60-outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company, re-branding all its stores as Starbucks. By November 2005, London had more outlets than Manhattan,[4] a sign of Starbucks becoming an international brand. In April 2003, Starbucks completed the purchase of Seattle's Best Coffee and Torrefazione Italia from AFC Enterprises, bringing the total number of Starbucks-operated locations worldwide to more than 6,400. On September 14, 2006, rival Diedrich Coffee announced that it would sell most of its company-owned retail stores to Starbucks. This sale includes the company owned locations of the Oregon-based Coffee People chain. Starbucks representatives have been quoted as saying they will convert the Diedrich Coffee and Coffee People locations to Starbucks stores.[5][6] Starbucks' chairman, Howard Schultz, has talked about the tension that exists in the company between their rapid expansion (they aim to eventually operate 40,000 retail stores worldwide)[7] and their collective desire to act like a small company. In January 2008, Chairman Howard Schultz resumed his role as Chief Executive Officer, replacing Jim Donald, who had succeeded Schultz in 2000. Schultz's principal challenge is to restore what he calls the "distinctive Starbucks experience" in the face of rapid expansion. Analysts believe that Schultz must determine how to contend with higher materials prices and enhanced competition from lower-price competitors, including McDonald's and Dunkin' Donuts. [8] On January 31, 2008, Schultz announced that Starbucks would discontinue its warm food products, originally scheduled to launch nationwide in 2008, in order to refocus the brand on coffee. Also in January 2008, with Dunkin' Donuts and McDonalds quickly becoming stiff competition in the specialty coffee market, Starbucks started testing selling an 8 oz "short" brewed coffee for $1 and giving free refills on all brewed coffee. So far this test is limited to the greater Seattle market, with no plans for expansion to national markets as of yet. The normal price for a short brewed coffee at Starbucks is about $1.50, when Dunkin' Donuts 10 ounce coffee runs for $1.39 and McDonalds' 12 ounce premium coffee is $1.07. [9] [edit] Products A Starbucks Venti Java Chip FrappuccinoStarbucks serves a variety of beverages including brewed coffee, hot chocolate, espresso, teas, and Frappuccino. Also available are bottled beverages including Naked Juice, Ethos water, San Pellegrino, Izze soda, and Horizon Organic Milk. Cappuccinos, and all other beverages with steamed-milk and/or foam can be customized to order with pumps of flavored syrups, reasonable temperature changes and additional espresso shots. Starbucks also offers blended beverages, such as the "Frappuccino Blended Coffee", a flavored drink of coffee, milk, and sugar blended with ice. The name is a portmanteau of frappé and cappuccino and was introduced in 1995. Starbucks markets seasonal beverages as well, such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte (Thanksgiving) Gingerbread Latte, Peppermint Mocha, Eggnog Latte (Christmas) and Leprechaun Latte (St. Patrick's Day). There is also seasonal brewed coffee, like the "Christmas Blend" of whole bean coffee. Starbucks supplements the beverage offerings with pastries, salads, cold sandwiches, coffee merchandise and at-home brewing equipment, and pre-packed or scooped coffee beans. Starbucks also has a variety of kosher products, but due to business hours and sandwich products a Starbucks retail store cannot be certified 'kosher' according to Jewish law.[10] Starbucks does not franchise with individuals within North America but does enter into licensing arrangements with some companies.[11] One example is of Starbucks store locations in airports, most of which are operated by HMSHost, owned by the Italian Autogrill group. Other licensed locations include grocery stores, major food services corporations, college and university campuses, and hospitals. In addition, Starbucks has partnered with Magic Johnson's Johnson Development Corporation to form Urban Coffee Opportunities, which opens retail locations in low-income urban areas.[12] [edit] Staffing There are usually from two to six partners (as Starbucks employees are called), all of them trained baristas, in each retail store at any one time. Black aprons labeled "Coffee Master" are worn by employees who have completed the Coffee Master course, which educates employees in not only the tasting, but also growing regions, roasting and purchasing (including fair trade practices) aspects of the coffee industry. In the United States and Canada Starbucks offers full benefits such as health, dental, and vision insurance, as well as stock-option grants and 401k with matching to employees who work an average of at least 20 hours per week. Each employee can receive a box of tea or a pound of coffee each week if they choose. As of 2008, Starbucks was ranked by Fortune magazine as the 7th best company to work for in the United States, up from 16th in 2007. In 2006 and 2005 it was ranked 29th and 11th, respectively.[13] Starbucks was also voted as one of the top ten UK workplaces by the Financial Times in 2007. [edit] "The Third Place" Starbucks in Frankfurt am Main, GermanyStarbucks envisions local outlets as a "third place" (besides home and work) to spend time, and store design is intended to achieve this. The café section of the store is often outfitted with stuffed chairs and tables with hard-backed chairs. Most stores provide free electricity for customers, and many stores also provide wireless internet access (provided in American stores by T-Mobile[14] and in Canadian stores by Bell Mobility[15]) The company is noted for its non-smoking policy at almost all of its outlets, despite predictions that this would never succeed in markets such as Germany, which used to have few restrictions on smoking. This has changed in 2007 with many German states issuing smoking bans for restaurants and bars. Outlets in Vienna and Mexico City, which have smoking rooms separated by double doors from the coffee shop itself, and a smoking room upstairs in the Largo do Senado, Macau, branch are the closest the company has come to making exceptions. According to the company, the smoking ban is to ensure that the coffee aroma is not adulterated. The company also asks its employees to refrain from wearing strong perfumes for similar reasons.[16] Starbucks generally does not prohibit smoking in outside seating areas, unless required by local codes. [edit] International operations Countries that contain Starbucks stores A typical sales area, this one in Peterborough, UK, showing a display of food and the beverage preparation area Starbucks inside Tsutaya in Shibuya, JapanStores are now found in Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia[17], Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. New stores will be opened in Argentina[18], Bulgaria[19] , Colombia[20], Hungary[21], India, Iraq, Morocco, Poland[22], Portugal[23], Serbia and South Africa. [edit] Intellectual property Starbucks U.S. Brands, LLC, is a Starbucks-owned company that currently holds and owns the property rights to approximately 120 Starbucks Coffee Company patents and trademarks. It is located at 2525 Starbucks Way in Minden, Nevada.[24] [edit] Name The company is named in part after Starbuck, Captain Ahab's first mate in the book Moby-Dick, as well as a turn-of-the-century mining camp (Starbo or Storbo) on Mount Rainier. According to Howard Schultz's book Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time, the name of the company was derived from Moby-Dick, although not in as direct a fashion as many assume. Gordon Bowker liked the name "Pequod" (the ship in the novel), but his creative partner Terry Heckler responded, "No one's going to drink a cup of Pee-quod!" Heckler suggested "Starbo." Brainstorming with these two ideas resulted in the company being named for the Pequod's first mate, Starbuck.[25] International names include: Arabic-speaking countries: ??????? (transliteration: starbaks) China, Hong Kong, Taiwan: ??? Pinyin: xingbakè (? xing means "star", while ?ba ?kè is a transliteration of "-bucks") Israel: ??????? (transliteration: s?arbaqs) Japan: ??????? (transliteration: sutabakkusu, phonological: staa-bahkss) South Korea: ???? (transliteration: seutabeokseu), often used in conjunction with the English name Quebec, Canada: Café Starbucks Coffee[26] (added the French word to avoid controversy with local language politics) Thailand: ?????????? pronounced [sota?bak?o] [edit] Logo The logo is a "twin-tailed siren" (the siren of Greek mythology).[27] The logo has been significantly streamlined over the years. In the first version, which gave the impression of an authentic 18th century European woodcut, the Starbucks siren was topless and had a fully-visible double fish tail. The image also had a rough visual texture. In the second version, her chest was covered by her flowing hair, but her navel was still visible, and the fish tail was cropped slightly. In the current version, her navel and chest are not visible at all, and only vestiges remain of the fish tails. The original "woodcut" logo can still be seen on the Starbucks store in Seattle's Pike Place Market, and on certain coffee bags. At the beginning of September 2006, Starbucks temporarily reintroduced its original brown logo on paper hot drink cups. Starbucks has stated that this was done to show the company's heritage from the Pacific Northwest and to celebrate 35 years of business. The vintage logo has sparked some controversy due to the siren's bare chest. Recently, an elementary school principal in Kent, Washington, was reported as asking teachers to "cover up" the mermaid of the retro cups with a cup sleeve of some kind.[27] [edit] Parodies and infringements In 2000, San Francisco cartoonist Kieron Dwyer was sued by Starbucks for copyright and trademark infringement after creating a parody of its siren logo and putting it on coffee mugs, t-shirts, and stickers that he sold on his website and at comic book conventions. Dwyer felt that since his work was a parody it was protected by his right to free speech under U.S. law. The judge agreed that Dwyer's work was a parody and thus enjoyed constitutional protection; however, he was forbidden from financially "profiting" from using a "confusingly similar" image of the Starbucks siren logo. Dwyer is currently allowed to display the image as an expression of free speech, but he can no longer sell it.[28] In 2003, Starbucks successfully sued a Shanghai competitor in China for trademark infringement, because that chain used a green-and-white logo with a similar sounding Chinese name.[29] Also in 2003, Starbucks sent a cease-and-desist letter to "HaidaBucks Coffee House" in Masset, British Columbia, Canada. The store was owned by a group of young Haida men, commonly referred to as "bucks." After facing criticism, Starbucks dropped its demand after HaidaBucks dropped "coffee house" from its name.[30] In 2005 Starbucks lost a trademark infringement case against a smaller coffee vendor in South Korea that operates coffee stations under the name and style Starpreya. The company, Elpreya, says Starpreya is named after the Norse goddess, Freja, with the letters of that name changed to ease pronunciation by Koreans. The court rejected the Seattle-based retailer's claim that the logo of Starpreya is too similar to the famous Starbucks logo.[31] [edit] Criticism and controversy Starbucks has come to be regarded by some, particularly in the global justice movement, as symbolic of the problems posed by globalization. Several activist groups maintain websites criticizing the company's fair-trade policies, labor relations, and environmental impact, and hold it as a prime example of U.S. cultural and economic imperialism. Several Starbucks locations were vandalized during the WTO meeting held in Seattle in late 1999. Although no organization claimed responsibility for the vandalism, the anarchist circle-A symbol was spray-painted on several stores.[32] [edit] Cultural imperialism Starbucks at the Forbidden City in Beijing (closed since July 2007)The Starbucks location in the former imperial palace in Beijing closed in July 2007. The coffee shop had been a source of ongoing controversy since its opening in 2000 with protesters objecting that the presence of the American chain in this location "was trampling on Chinese culture".[33][34][35][36] [edit] Anti-competitive tactics Some of the methods Starbucks has used to expand and maintain their dominant market position, such as buying out competitors' leases, acquiring independent coffee shops and converting them into Starbucks stores, and clustering several locations in a small geographical area (i.e., saturating the market), have been labeled anti-competitive by critics.[37] For example, Starbucks fueled its initial expansion into the UK market with a buyout of its only major potential competitor (the 49 outlet, UK-based Seattle Coffee Company), then used its capital and influence to obtain prime locations, some of which operated at a financial loss. Critics claimed this was an unfair attempt to drive out small, independent competitors, who could not afford to pay inflated prices for premium real estate.[38] [edit] Labor disputes Since 2004, workers at seven Starbucks stores in New York City have joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) as the Starbucks Workers Union.[39] According to a Starbucks Union press release, since then, the union membership has begun expanding to Chicago and Maryland.[40] On March 7, 2006, the IWW and Starbucks agreed to a National Labor Relations Board settlement in which three Starbucks workers were granted almost US$2,000 in back wages and two fired employees were offered reinstatement.[41][42][43] According to the Starbucks Union, on November 24, 2006, IWW members picketed Starbucks locations in more than 50 cities around the world in countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain and New Zealand, as well as U.S. cities including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco,[44] to protest the firing of five Starbucks Workers Union organizers by Starbucks and to demand their reinstatement. Some Starbucks baristas in Canada,[45] Australia and New Zealand,[46] and the United States[47] belong to a variety of unions. In 2005, Starbucks paid out US$165,000 to eight employees at its Kent, Washington, roasting plant to settle charges that they had been retaliated against for being pro-union. At the time, the plant workers were represented by the IUOE. Starbucks admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement.[39] A Starbucks strike occurred in Auckland, New Zealand, on November 23, 2005.[46] Organized by Unite Union, workers sought secure hours, a minimum wage of NZ$12 an hour, and the abolition of youth rates. The company settled with the Union in 2006, resulting in pay increases, increased security of hours, and an improvement in youth rates.[48] According to Starbucks Chairman Howard Schulz, "If they had faith in me and my motives, they wouldn't need a union." According to The Seattle Times, "The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 286 had trouble with Starbucks at its Kent roasting plant, where the union no longer represents workers".[39] [edit] Coffee bean market In 2000, the company introduced a line of fair trade products.[49] Of the approximately 136,000 tonnes (300 million pounds) of coffee Starbucks purchased in 2006, about 6 percent was certified as fair trade.[50] According to Starbucks, they purchased 2,180 tonnes (4.8 million pounds) of Certified Fair Trade coffee in fiscal year 2004 and 5,220 tonnes (11.5 million pounds) in 2005. They have become the largest buyer of Certified Fair Trade coffee in North America (10% of the global market). Transfair USA,[51] the only third-party certifier of Fair Trade Certified coffee in the United States, has noted the impact Starbucks has made in the area of Fair Trade and coffee farmer's lives by saying: Since launching {its} FTC coffee line in 2000, Starbucks has undeniably made a significant contribution to family farmers through their rapidly growing FTC coffee volume. By offering FTC coffee in thousands of stores, Starbucks has also given the FTC label greater visibility, helping to raise consumer awareness in the process. Groups such as Global Exchange are calling for Starbucks to further increase its sales of fair trade coffees. However, fair trade certification can cost US$20,000 to US$30,000[citation needed], and many growers are unwilling or unable to pay for certification[citation needed]. [edit] Ethos water controversy Ethos, a brand of bottled water acquired by Starbucks in 2005, is sold at locations throughout North America. Ethos bottles feature prominent labeling stating "helping children get clean water", referring to the fact that $.05 from each $1.80USD bottle sold ($.10 per unit in Canada) is used to fund clean water projects in under-developed areas. Critics have argued that the claim on the label misleads consumers into thinking that Ethos is primarily a charitable organization, when it is actually a for-profit Starbucks brand and the vast majority of the sale price (over 94%) does not support clean-water projects.[52] Although sales of Ethos water has raised over $4,000,000 for clean water efforts, the brand is not a charity and has added to Starbucks revenue.[53] The founders of Ethos have stated that the brand is intended to raise awareness of third-world clean water issues and provide socially responsible consumers with an opportunity to support the cause by choosing Ethos over other brands.[54] Starbucks has since redesigned the American version of the Ethos water bottles, stating the amount of money donated per bottle in the description. [edit] Recycled paper cups In 2006, Starbucks introduced cups made with 10 percent recycled material. With 1.5 billion cups used annually in the United States at that time, the change was estimated to save approximately five million pounds of virgin tree fiber a year. Prior to the announcement, Starbucks used recycled paper into its cardboard cup sleeves, napkins, and cardboard carriers. A major obstacle for the recycled paper cup was that recycled content had never before been used in direct contact with food, especially not with steaming hot beverages. Although permission was not required, Starbucks and its pulp manufacturer, the Mississippi River Corporation, decided to seek Food and Drug Administration approval for the new cups. Had Starbucks not bothered to get F.D.A. approval, the cup development process would have taken only three months instead of more than two years. Starbucks said it was the first time that a national food chain had incorporated recycled material into packaging that comes into direct contact with food or beverages, but critics claim that the company should be doing much more to protect the environment.[55][56] [edit] Other ventures Main article: Hear Music Starbucks entered the music industry in 1999 with the acquisition of Hear Music, and the film industry in 2006 with the creation of Starbucks Entertainment. Starbucks Entertainment was one of the producers of the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee. Retail stores heavily advertised the film before its release. Hear Music is the brand name of Starbucks' retail music concept. Hear Music began as a catalog company in 1990 and was purchased by Starbucks in 1999. Nearly three years later, in 2002, they produced a Starbucks opera album, featuring artists such as Luciano Pavarotti. [edit] Starbucks and Apple Starbucks has entered into a partnership with Apple to collaborate on selling music as part of the coffeehouse experience. In October of 2006, Apple added a Starbucks Entertainment area to the iTunes Music Store, selling similar music that appeared in Starbucks stores. In September of 2007 Apple announced that there would be wireless communication between Apple and Starbucks. Through the T-Mobile Wi-Fi, a paywall is opened up to allow any individual connecting to T-Mobile Hotspot access to the iTunes Music Store (regardless of whether he or she is a T-Mobile Hotspot subscriber). The partnership is primarily targeted at iPhone, iPod Touch, and Macbook users (although anyone with access to iTunes can take advantage of it). In addition, the iTunes Music Store will automatically detect the current and last 10 songs playing in a Starbucks and offer users connected to the store's wireless network the opportunity to download the tracks. This feature has been rolled out in Seattle, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area, and will slowly be offered in limited markets during 2007-2008.[57] During the fall of 2007 Starbucks also began to sell digital downloads of certain albums through iTunes. The buyer would buy the download at Starbucks, and enter the code on the download card at the iTunes Music Store, and then the entire album would immediately start downloading. From October 2 to November 7, 2007, Starbucks gave away 37 different songs for free download through iTunes as part of the "Song of the Day" promotion. Each day, baristas would give out download cards for a particular song which could be redeemed on [edit] See also List of coffeehouse chains
menu boardcoffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Explore every cup The vast range of Starbucks coffees and our expertise on the subject await. Find out what’s being served in stores each week and follow it up with everything you might ever care to know about our roasts. Featured Coffee Espresso Roast Rich, full flavored and at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Featured Coffee Espresso Roast - Decaf Rich, full flavored decaf at the heart of all our espresso drinks. More info. Find a store near you Coffee Menu Board Find your roast by name, region or flavor profile in our full lineup of coffees. Whole beans by the click Order your favorite coffees at the Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Fresh bags will be shipped direct to your home brewing station. Shop for Coffee Online Caffé Latte Rich espresso mingles with steamed milk. Discover Now. Caffé Americano Mix shots of rich espresso with piping hot water. Discover Now. Honey Latte Add a kiss of honey and spice to sweeten your traditional latte. Discover Now. beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Latte Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso in steamed milk lightly topped with foam. Try something new Cappuccino Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 190 Fat Calories 60 Total Fat (g) 7 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 30 Sodium (mg) 150 Total Carbohydrates (g) 18 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 17 Protein (g) 12 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Caffè Americano Espresso and hot water Rich, full-bodied Starbucks® espresso combined with hot water for the European alternative to American-style brewed coffee. Try something new Iced Caffè Americano Coffee of the Week Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 15 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Sodium (mg) 10 Total Carbohydrates (g) 3 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 2% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 225 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short beverage lineuphear musicbookslocal events nutrition information beverages food brewing equipmentthe way I see itwireless internetethos watertazo teassite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Honey Latte A blend of honey and a touch of warm spice flavors combined with espresso and freshly steamed milk. Topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of pure, golden honey. Serving Size 16 fl. oz. Amt Per Serving Calories 200 Fat Calories 0 Total Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Trans Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 5 Sodium (mg) 140 Total Carbohydrates (g) 39 Fiber (g) 0 Sugars (g) 37 Protein (g) 11 Vitamin A 15% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 40% Iron 0% Caffeine (mg) 150 * Nutritional information is calculated based on Starbucks standardized recipes. Because beverages are handcrafted and may be customized, exact information may vary. Data is calculated using ESHA Research's Genesis® R&D software, and rounded to meet FDA regulations. Data for vitamins and minerals refers to percentage of U.S. recommended daily intake values. For additional information, please contact a customer care representative at 1-800-23LATTE (1-800-235-2883). * Caffeine information is approximate and is based on limited analytical data. These values reflect Starbucks standard brewing methods. Values can vary greatly based on the variety of the coffee and the brewing equipment used. The handcrafted nature of our beverages may result in a variation from the reported values. For more information about a balanced diet visit: www.mypyramid.gov www.americanheart.org www.nationaldairycouncil.org Compare all Starbucks® Beverages Select another product Size Tall Grande Venti® Short Milk Nonfat Whole 2% Soy (US) Soy (CD) Whipped Cream Yes No menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast - Decaf Decaf Espresso Roast is used in every decaf espresso drink in our stores. Smooth, great balance, with a hint of acidity and a sweet, caramelly finish. This coffee offers a decaf espresso experience for any time of day. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast Decaf Espresso in disguise: a decaf café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a decaf café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; a decaf Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with decaf espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee educationblack apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Espresso Roast A blend of coffees from Latin America and Asia/Pacific, Espresso Roast has a dense and a smooth, satisfying finish. The heart and soul of Starbucks. Versatile because of its delicious flavor, smooth texture and balance, Espresso Roast imparts a subtle sweetness. It’s roasted somewhat darker than traditional Italian espresso blends, and works as well in your home machine as it does in our stores. Key term: Rich, full flavored We see the bean’s potential To create a great dark-roasted coffee, we first purchase and blend great unroasted coffee. Then our experts go to work, diligently roasting the beans with an artisan’s touch to bring out the exquisite caramelly-sweet and smoky flavors locked inside. Purchase this coffee online at the new Starbucks Store, brought to you by Cooking.com. Espresso Roast - Decaf Caffè Verona® Italian Roast Espresso in disguise: a café latte is fabulous with almonds and macaroons; a café mocha is smooth with any caramel or vanilla dessert; an Americano is intensified with spicy baked goods like carrot cake; of course, chocolate is stellar with espresso in any form. A blend of Latin American and Indonesian coffees. Buy espresso online Espresso Roast and Espresso Pods are available online at StarbucksStore.com. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Look at the world of coffee through the eyes of Starbucks People have celebrated this magic bean from the time of the first brewing experiments with wild coffee beans in ancient Arabia. The brewing methods and roasting techniques may have changed since then, but our love of coffee for its invigorating effects and satisfying flavor has continued to grow. Read on to learn about the story of coffee, as it travels from the tree in its country of origin to the cup in your hand. It's a journey that affects its flavors and taste characteristics, and ultimately, your coffee experience. The history of coffee As rich as the brew itself, the History of Coffee tells the story of the bean as well as the coffee culture. Sustainable purchasing guidelines Learn more about certified and conservation coffees such as Fair Trade Certified™ and organic. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Personal flavor Let us recommend coffees according to your preferences. 1. What does coffee do for you? It's the magic potion that gets me going in the morning. It's part of a calming ritual that lets me step back from my busy day. It's my reward. It inspires me to enjoy life a little bit more. It's a culinary experience. Each cup challenges me to find new flavors. 2. What taste characteristic do you look for in a cup of coffee? It should taste good, but not too strong. It must be richer than I'd find in a typical diner or fast-food coffee. It should be complex enough to make me think, without overwhelming my senses. The wilder, the better... I like to experiment. 3. How do you like your coffee brewed? Brewed with an automatic drip. Brewed with a "manual pour" drip. Brewed with a coffee press. Brewed with an espresso machine. 4. Which best describes you as a coffee drinker? I'll drink whatever anyone is pouring. I've been known to go out of my way for a better cup of coffee. I enjoy sampling new coffees, as long as they have the rich flavors I love. I like to experiment with different types of coffee so that I can compare and contrast their flavors. 5. How do you drink your coffee? Cream and sugar. Sugar only. Cream only. Black. 6. What sort of flavors do you generally enjoy? Simple, mild flavors. Fresh, vibrant tastes that aren't too rich and complex. Bold and distinctive flavors with lots of subtleties I can taste. I like extremes: heavy, rich, spicy, intense. The more, the better. 7. What do you usually order in a restaurant? I have one or two favorite dishes... no point messing with a good thing. Once in a while I'll take a chance and try something new. Within reason, I enjoy trying new things. Call me crazy, but I'll try anything once. New & certified organic Another Commitment to Origin™ coffee, Serena Organic Blend™ has a citrus & floral aroma. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Drink deeper There are so many Starbucks® coffees to choose from – learn more about coffee, cupping & the senses. Ultimately, tasting is comparing and contrasting. Tasting only one coffee at a time does not create any context. But if you taste two or three coffees, you can compare them in terms of your personal preference, but also in terms of aroma, acidity, body, and flavor. (A tip: When tasting more than one coffee, always taste lighter bodied coffees first and work up to fuller bodied coffees.) Aroma is the first hint of how your coffee will taste. In fact, most of your sense of taste actually comes from your sense of smell - which is why coffee can taste so satisfying and sublime. Acidity, in tasting terms, doesn't mean sour or bitter; it's a lively, tangy, palate-cleansing property, ranging from low to high. Think of the range from still water to sparkling water, and you'll get the idea. Body is the weight or thickness of the beverage on your tongue. Body ranges from light to full. Flavor is the all important melding of aroma, acidity, and body that creates an overall impression. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The recipe for a great cup of coffee Proportion, Grind, Water and Freshness. Understand and follow the guidelines for each of them, and you're on your way to brewing a great cup of coffee every time. Use the right proportion of coffee to water This is the most important step in making great coffee. For the most flavorful cup of coffee, Starbucks recommends two tablespoons of ground coffee (10 grams) for each six fluid ounces (180 milliliters) of water. If coffee brewed this way is too strong for your taste, you can add a little hot water to your cup of brewed coffee. The shorter the brewing process, the finer the grind. Different brewing methods have different grind requirements, so grind your coffee for the brewing method you use. The amount of time the coffee and water spend together affects the flavor elements that end up in your cup of coffee, and the design of your coffee maker dictates how long the coffee and water sit in direct contact during the brewing process. For instance, coffee ground for an espresso machine should be very fine, in part because the brew cycle is only 19 to 22 seconds long. But for a coffee press, the coffee should be coarse ground, because the water and coffee are in direct contact for about four minutes. Use fresh, cold water heated to just off the boil A cup of coffee is 98 percent water. Therefore, the water you use to make coffee should taste clean, fresh, and free of impurities. Water heated to just off a boil (195° to 205° F or 90° to 96° C) is perfect for extracting the coffee's full range of flavors. Any cooler and the water can't adequately do the job. Automatic coffee makers heat the water for you. Make sure the one you use gets the water hot enough. Use freshly ground coffee Think of coffee as fresh produce. The enemies of coffee are oxygen, light, heat, and moisture. To keep coffee fresh, store it in an opaque, airtight container at room temperature. Storing coffee in the refrigerator or freezer for daily use can damage the coffee as warm, moist air condenses to the beans whenever the container is opened. For the best results, coffee should be ground just before brewing. Whole bean coffee stays fresh longer because there is less surface area exposed to oxygen. By grinding beans each time you brew, the freshness is preserved. Additionally, the person making the coffee will enjoy the freshness as the grinder releases the aromas inside the bean. Tasting Tips Develop your coffee palate with our helpful Tasting Tips. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced To Blend or Not to Blend Starbucks procures both single-origin coffees and regional blends from around the world. Single-origin coffees showcase what is possible in individual coffees.Blends weave together coffees from different origins to create a taste tapestry for your tongue. Some coffees are purchased solely for blending while others are purchased as single-origin offerings. Single-Origin Coffees We offer specific, individual coffees from 10 to 15 different countries. Each of these coffees displays an assortment of distinctive flavor characteristics. We call these "single-origin" coffees. The term "varietal" is often misused. Arabica is one species within the genus of coffee (robusta is another species). Each species has varieties ranked underneath it, and there are many varieties of arabica coffee trees. While "varietal" is a botanical term, "single-origin" is a geographical term, and the most accurate way to describe coffees from a specific country. As green coffee beans are often grown by multiple farmers and then mixed at their place of origin, a "single-origin" coffee from a specific geographical area may have coffee beans from multiple varieties of arabica plants. An example of a true varietal coffee is Brazil Ipanema BourbonTM, introduced by Starbucks in the spring of 1999. The "Bourbon" part of its name refers to its varietal status. All of the beans come from unmixed, old-stock Bourbon plants, which are prized for their elegant flavor. "Ipanema" refers to the actual farm where it is grown, thus this coffee, a Starbucks exclusive, is both a single-origin and a varietal coffee. Starbucks Blends In addition to great single-origin coffees, our core lineup also includes blends of different single-origin coffees. The blends as a group make up a significant percentage of our whole bean coffee lineup, and each is as special in its own way as the most exotic single-origin coffee. There are many reasons to blend coffee. At Starbucks, we seek to showcase the signature style of a particular growing region (as in House Blend or Gazebo Blend®) or to combine various qualities found in different regions into a harmonious, balanced whole. Whatever the case, each Starbucks blend offers a cup of coffee that no single-origin coffee can duplicate. Dark Roast Blends We also offer three dark roast blends: Starbucks Espresso Roast, Italian Roast, and French. These blends vary both in constituent coffees and roast intonation. Starbucks Espresso Roast is the foundation of our beverage business. Italian Roast and French Roast are among our more popular coffees. The Four Fundamentals Learn how to brew the perfect cup using our Four Fundamentals. of Coffee. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced We're passionate about the way we roast our coffee. We call our roast the Starbucks Roast®. It's more than a color: it is the cumulative, positive, and dramatic result of roasting each coffee in a unique way, helping each one reach its maximum flavor. The color can be duplicated -- but the taste cannot. The coffee bean begins its life as the prize inside a bright red coffee cherry. It takes about five years before a coffee tree produces a harvestable crop of cherries, and each tree only produces the equivalent of a pound of roasted beans per year. To prepare the pebble-like green coffee beans for roasting, growers process them using either the natural or the washed method. Through the natural method, ripe coffee cherries are allowed to dry on the tree or on the ground before the beans are removed by hulling. Through the washed method, the beans are immediately separated from the cherries, submerged in a vat of water, and then dried on large patios or with modern equipment. Green coffee beans are heated in a large rotating drum, then their transformation begins. After about 5 to 7 minutes of intense heat, much of their moisture evaporates. The beans turn a yellow color and smell a little like popcorn. After about 8 minutes in the roaster, the "first pop" occurs. The beans double in size, crackling as they expand. They are now light brown. Very sour one-dimensional flavor notes are dominant, while more complex coffee flavors haven't yet developed. After 10-11 minutes in the roaster, the beans reach an even brown color, and oil starts to appear on the surface of the bean. At this roasting time (different for each coffee, but usually somewhere between 11 and 15 minutes), the full flavor potential begins to develop in the beans, bringing all of their attributes into balance. The "second pop" signals that the coffee is almost ready. The moment that the coffee is released into the cooling tray is a memorable one. The smell of freshly roasted coffee fills the air, along with the sound of applause created by the final clapping of the "second pop." Growing Regions. Most of the world's coffee comes from three specific Growing Regions. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced The history of coffee is as rich as the brew itself, dating back more than a thousand years. The first coffee plants are said to have come from the Horn of Africa on the shores of the Red Sea. Originally, coffee beans were taken as a food and not as a beverage. East African tribes would grind the coffee cherries together, mixing the results into a paste with animal fat. Rolled into little balls, the mixture was said to give warriors much-needed energy for battle. Later, around the year 1000 AD, Ethiopians concocted a type of wine from coffee berries, fermenting the dried beans in water. Coffee also grew naturally on the Arabian Peninsula, and it was there, during the 11th century that coffee was first developed into a hot drink. The so-called stimulating properties of coffee were thought by many during these ancient times to give a sort of religious ecstasy, and the drink earned a very mystical sort of reputation, shrouded in secrecy and associated with priests and doctors. So, it is not surprising that two prominent legends emerged to explain the discovery of this magic bean. According to one story, a goat-herder noticed that his herd became friskier than usual after consuming the red cherries of a wild coffee shrub. Curious, he tasted the fruit himself. He was delighted by its invigorating effects, and was even spotted by a group of nearby monks dancing with his goats. Soon the monks began to boil the bean themselves and use the liquid to stay awake during all-night ceremonies. The other story is about a Muslim dervish who was condemned by his enemies to wander in the desert and eventually die of starvation. In his delirium, the young man heard a voice instructing him to eat the fruit from a nearby coffee tree. Confused, the dervish tried to soften the beans in water, and when this failed, he simply drank the liquid. Interpreting his survival and energy as a sign of God, he returned to his people, spreading the faith and the recipe. The cultivation of coffee began sometime in the fifteenth century, and for many centuries to follow, the Yemen province of Arabia was the world's primary source of coffee. The demand for coffee in the Near East was very high. The beans leaving the Yemeni port of Mocha for trade with Alexandria and Constantinople were highly guarded. In fact, no fertile plants were allowed to leave the country. Despite the restrictions, Muslim pilgrims from across the globe during their pilgrimages to Mecca managed to smuggle coffee plants back to their homelands, and coffee crops soon took root in India. Coffee also made its way into Europe around this time through the city of Venice, where fleets traded perfumes, teas, dyes and fabrics with Arabic merchants along the Spice Route. The beverage eventually gained popularity with the masses when street lemonade vendors began selling it in addition to cold beverages. Many European merchants grew accustomed to drinking coffee overseas and brought it back with them. By the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated the world's merchant shipping industry, and they introduced large-scale coffee cultivation to their colonies in Indonesia on the islands of Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Bali. Coffee arrived in Latin America several decades later, when the French brought a cutting of a coffee plant to Martinique. But when a rare plant disease spread through the coffee fields of Southeast Asia in the mid 19th century, Brazil emerged as the world's foremost coffee producer, an honor the country still holds today. The Roast Story Our roasting technique is what sets us apart. The Roast Story is an integral part of the Starbucks Experience. menu board coffee education coffee taste matcher tasting coffee the four fundamentals coffee blending the roast story history of coffee growing regions coffee trees & beans harvesting coffee buying coffee for starbucks coffee education specialists black apron exclusivescoffee conversationssite map . nutrition . international . customer service . search . your account Store Locator Advanced Geography is a flavor You can tell a lot about your favorite coffee if you know where it was grown. The three growing regions below represent the source of all Arabica coffee beans, each one producing its own distinct flavor profile. Central and South America produce far more coffee than any other growing region. Coffees from Latin America are celebrated for their great balance, medium body and clean finish. A tangy brightness and consistent quality also make them ideal foundations for blending. Single-origin coffees from this region typically include coffees from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia. Purchasing guidelines The Commitment to Origins™ coffee category showcases sustainable high-quality coffees. Coffee and Conservation Starbucks growing partnership with Conservation International.